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  • Daily Technology

    We've got posts on knives and tools. We've got posts on guns. How about the technology we carry each day? Not just cell phones, but tablets, laptops, cameras, etc. How do you keep them alive in an extended away from home mission?

    I carry an iPhone 3GS, an iPad (first gen), a Flip Video camera, and an older Casio Exlim digital camera. I keep a travel and car charger for the i-products in my Go Bag - these are USB based, so I only have to carry one wall and car adapter and a USB cord. I have extra batteries for the Flip. I haven't figured out a way to charge my Casio. Thank goodness my truck (2010 Dodge Rma) has a built in inverter.
    Don't pick a fight with an old man. If he's too old to fight, he'll just kill you.

  • #2
    wow you have a lot of gadgets. I try to keep it simple, or maybe I'm just simple lol. I only carry a blackberry. If it goes down then I'm screwed as far as phone numbers go. I better make a hard copy. Glad your thread made me think of that.

    I've seen small solar panel set ups that may be able to help you. Also I have a hand cranked lantern / radio that came with different plugs to charge cell phones etc. You just may have to do a lot of hand cranking to get enough juice into the gadget.

    Comment


    • #3
      I try to stay as close to the stone age as I can .... reliance on the tech may become problematic in the event of failure. I recall some folks here discussing downloading information to thumb drives and such .... I stick with hard copies. I wish you good luck with tech.

      O.W.
      Things are seldom what they seem.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Oscar Wilde View Post
        I try to stay as close to the stone age as I can .... reliance on the tech may become problematic in the event of failure. I recall some folks here discussing downloading information to thumb drives and such .... I stick with hard copies. I wish you good luck with tech.

        O.W.
        I am....as is the group....very set on having hard copies....But I'm thinking of ease of use for the day and age. I have been contemplating a Kindle for a while.

        I'll still continue printing them out and binding....but the search-ability of having it at you fingertips....is alluring...:)
        Live like you'll die tomorrow, learn like you'll live forever.

        Comment


        • #5
          come on Tech is good, where would we be with out a hoop and stick. LOL

          seriously though, I love tech, but its not part of my preps. I have a Garmin Gps gathering dust on a shelf. since it never seems to work right when Im in deep woods or below ridge lines. my compass has never failed me in any type of terrain.

          I have some radios, that depending on the situation are set to be added to my gear bag. but over all, its all old school. the only tech I carry just about every where are my camera's.
          Last edited by TennOutdoors; 07-03-2011, 01:05 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            I recently saw an ad on the outdoor channel for a solar charger for GPS, cells etc. It mounts to a back pack for use when active. I'm not sure of universal compatability but it does look promising. I of course was a little distracted when watching, so I can't tell you the brand name or anything truly useful about it.

            Comment


            • #7
              I just bought a Casio Pathfinder Watch. I wanted a solar powered watch with a decent compass. This on has that and then some. I have been using a Luminox with a strap on compass for years and wanted a change. The casio is great and the compass spot on. I wouldn't use it as my main, but it would work as one.



              Tough Solar Power
              Digital Compass
              Measures and displays direction as one of 16 points
              Measuring range: 0 to 359 degrees
              Measuring unit: 1 degree
              Altimeter
              Measuring range: -700 to 10,000m (-2,300 to 32,800ft)
              Measuring unit: 5m (20ft)
              Auto memory measurements
              Altimeter Memory
              Manual memory measurements (up to 25 records, each including altitude, date, time)
              Auto memory measurements (High altitude, Low altitude memory, Total ascent, Total descent)
              Others: Reference altitude setting, Altitude graph,
              Altitude differential
              Barometer
              Display range: 260 to 1,100 hPa (7.65 to 32.45 inHg)
              Display unit: 1 hPa (0.05 inHg)
              Atmospheric pressure tendency graph
              Atmospheric pressure differential graphic
              Thermometer
              Display range: -10 to 60 C (14 to 140 F)
              Display unit: 0.1 C (0.2 F)
              Sunrise/Sunset Data
              Displays sunrise time and sunset time for a specific date,
              Daylight pointers
              100M Water Resistant
              Low Temperature Resistant (-10 C / 14 F)
              Full Auto EL Backlight with Afterglow
              Duplex LCD
              World Time: 31 times zones (48 cities), city code display, daylight saving on/off
              5 Daily Alarms
              Hourly Time Signal
              1/100 second stopwatch
              Measuring capacity: 23:59'59.99"
              Measuring modes: Elapsed time, split time, 1st-2nd place times
              Full Auto Calendar (pre-programmed until the year 2099)
              Countdown Timer
              Measuring unit: 1 second
              Countdown start time setting range: 1 minute to 24 hours (1-minute increments and 1-hour increments)
              12/24 Hour Formats
              Button operation tone on/off
              Accuracy: +/-15 seconds per month
              Storage Battery: Solar Rechargeable Battery
              Battery Power Indicator
              Power Saving Function
              Approximate battery life: 6 months on full charge (without further exposure to light)
              Case size: 57.3 x 50.9 x 15.3mm (approximately 2.5" x 2")
              Module 3246

              Comment


              • #8
                I wear a Casio Pathfinder watch and I am forced to carry a cell phone. I have a strong concern with regards to modern man's dependence on technology. As a result I try to avoid it where ever possible.

                I should note that I am very tech savvy having spent 10 years at IBM... I just hate how we depend on it. Where I live 3 days without power in the -30 to -40 winter and most of my neighbors would be dead. sad..


                All it takes for the forces of evil to rule the world is for enough good men to do nothing.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Ranger2011 View Post
                  I wear a Casio Pathfinder watch and I am forced to carry a cell phone. I have a strong concern with regards to modern man's dependence on technology. As a result I try to avoid it where ever possible.

                  I should note that I am very tech savvy having spent 10 years at IBM... I just hate how we depend on it. Where I live 3 days without power in the -30 to -40 winter and most of my neighbors would be dead. sad..


                  All it takes for the forces of evil to rule the world is for enough good men to do nothing.
                  Well said Ranger... I too have been in IT for many years, and feel the same as you. On a daily basis I see people become more and more dependent on technology. Thanks to the GPS, map reading is one generation away, at most, from becoming extinct. Heaven forbid someone would ever have to balance a checkbook manually. I dont know how many times my son has been in crisis because his mobile phone battery died and he needed to retrieve a phone number for the movie theater, autoparts store, etc...

                  "Michael... calm down, just look it up n the phone book".
                  "The what? "
                  "The phone book".
                  "Oh... Umm what would it be under?"
                  "Autoparts"
                  "There's no listing for autoparts"
                  "You have to go to the yellowpages in the back"
                  "Oh..... Found it... Where's the phone?"
                  "Your Sister's on it"
                  "AAAARGGGG!!!"

                  That being said... I carry a Blackberry, two flashdrives (SanDisk Cruzers) and a Casio G-Shock Solar.

                  The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Cell phones have a built in GPS that can be used to track your location.

                    snip
                    ...but security experts say that many governments around the world enjoy the ability to monitor BlackBerry conversations as they do communications involving most types of mobile devices.
                    snip

                    http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/...67246V20100803


                    snip
                    As it rolls out a new iPhone operating system and an advertising platform, Apple is changing its privacy policy to allow collection and sharing of “precise location data,” including “real-time geographic location” of devices.
                    snip

                    http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2010/06/...location-data/

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Stitch View Post
                      Cell phones have a built in GPS that can be used to track your location.

                      snip
                      ...but security experts say that many governments around the world enjoy the ability to monitor BlackBerry conversations as they do communications involving most types of mobile devices.
                      snip

                      http://www.reuters.com/article/2010/...67246V20100803


                      snip
                      As it rolls out a new iPhone operating system and an advertising platform, Apple is changing its privacy policy to allow collection and sharing of “precise location data,” including “real-time geographic location” of devices.
                      snip

                      http://blogs.wsj.com/digits/2010/06/...location-data/
                      This is true, though you can turn the GPS function off... I'm still not sure that I would trust it.
                      I'm not concerned with this issue since I'm not talking about anything or going anyplace that I shouldn't be while on my Blackberry. It holds no needed data, and pulls only daily phone/email/text duties. In a post event situation, my Blackberry will more than likely be useless anyway.... Plus if I was up to no good... I'd 86 the phone before hand.
                      I keep a laptop secure for reading the USB drives, plus I keep hard copies of everything that's on them.
                      The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Know Your Rights!

                        snip
                        Q: Can the police enter my home to search my computer or portable device, like a laptop or cell phone?
                        A: No, in most instances, unless they have a warrant. But there are two major exceptions: (1) you consent to the search;1 or (2) the police have probable cause to believe there is incriminating evidence on the computer that is under immediate threat of destruction.2
                        Q: What if the police have a search warrant to enter my home, but not to search my computer? Can they search it then?
                        A: No, typically, because a search warrant only allows the police to search the area or items described in the warrant.3 But if the warrant authorizes the police to search for evidence of a particular crime, and such evidence is likely to be found on your computer, some courts have allowed the police to search the computer without a warrant.4 Additionally, while the police are searching your home, if they observe something in plain view on the computer that is suspicious or incriminating, they may take it for further examination and can rely on their observations to later get a search warrant.5 And of course, if you consent, any search of your computer is permissible.
                        Q: Can my roommate/guest/spouse/partner allow the police access to my computer?
                        A: Maybe. A third party can consent to a search as long as the officers reasonably believe the third person has control over the thing to be searched.6 However, the police cannot search if one person with control (for example a spouse) consents, but another individual (the other spouse) with control does not.7 One court, however, has said that this rule applies only to a residence, and not personal property, such as a hard drive placed into someone else's computer.8
                        Q: What if the police want to search my computer, but I'm not the subject of their investigation?
                        A: It typically does not matter whether the police are investigating you, or think there is evidence they want to use against someone else located on your computer. If they have a warrant, you consent to the search, or they think there is something incriminating on your computer that may be immediately destroyed, the police can search it. Regardless of whether you're the subject of an investigation, you can always seek the assistance of a lawyer.
                        Q: Can I see the warrant?
                        A: Yes. The police must take the warrant with them when executing it and give you a copy of it.9 They must also knock and announce their entry before entering your home10 and must serve the warrant during the day in most circumstances.11
                        Q: Can the police take my computer with them and search it somewhere else?
                        A: Yes. As long as the police have a warrant, they can seize the computer and take it somewhere else to search it more thoroughly. As part of that inspection, the police may make a copy of media or other files stored on your computer.12
                        Q: Do I have to cooperate with them when they are searching?
                        A: No, you do not have to help the police conduct the search. But you should not physically interfere with them, obstruct the search, or try to destroy evidence, since that can lead to your arrest. This is true even if the police don't have a warrant and you do not consent to the search, but the police insist on searching anyway. In that instance, do not interfere but write down the names and badge numbers of the officers and immediately call a lawyer.
                        Q: Do I have to answer their questions while they are searching my home without a warrant?
                        A: No, you do not have to answer any questions. In fact, because anything you say can be used against you and other individuals, it is best to say nothing at all until you have a chance to talk to a lawyer. However, if you do decide to answer questions, be sure to tell the truth. It is a crime to lie to a police officer and you may find yourself in more trouble for lying to law enforcement than for whatever it was they wanted on your computer.13
                        Q: If the police ask for my encryption keys or passwords, do I have to turn them over?
                        A: No. The police can't force you to divulge anything. However, a judge or a grand jury may be able to. The Fifth Amendment protects you from being forced to give the government self-incriminating testimony. If turning over an encryption key or password triggers this right, not even a court can force you to divulge the information. But whether that right is triggered is a difficult question to answer. If turning over an encryption key or password will reveal to the government information it does not have (such as demonstrating that you have control over files on a computer), there is a strong argument that the Fifth Amendment protects you.14 If, however, turning over passwords and encryption keys will not incriminate you, then the Fifth Amendment does not protect you. Moreover, even if you have a Fifth Amendment right that protects your encryption keys or passwords, a grand jury or judge may still order you to disclose your data in an unencrypted format under certain circumstances.15 If you find yourself in a situation where the police are demanding that you turn over encryption keys or passwords, let EFF know.
                        Q: If my computer is taken and searched, can I get it back?
                        A: Perhaps. If your computer was illegally seized, then you can file a motion with the court to have the property returned.16 If the police believe that evidence of a crime has been found on your computer (such as "digital contraband" like pirated music and movies, or digital images of child pornography), the police can keep the computer as evidence. They may also attempt to make you forfeit the computer, but you can challenge that in court.17
                        Q: What about my work computer?
                        A: It depends. Generally, you have some Fourth Amendment protection in your office or workspace.18 This means the police need a warrant to search your office and work computer unless one of the exceptions described above applies. But the extent of Fourth Amendment protection depends on the physical details of your work environment, as well as any employer policies. For example, the police will have difficulty justifying a warrantless search of a private office with doors and a lock and a private computer that you have exclusive access to. On the other hand, if you share a computer with other co-workers, you will have a weaker expectation of privacy in that computer, and thus less Fourth Amendment protection.19 However, be aware that your employer can consent to a police request to search an office or workspace.20 Moreover, if you work for a public entity or government agency, no warrant is required to search your computer or office as long as the search is for a non-investigative, work-related matter.21
                        Q: I've been arrested. Can the police search my cell phone without a warrant?
                        A: Maybe. After a person has been arrested, the police generally may search the items on her person and in her pockets, as well as anything within her immediate control.22 This means that the police can physically take your cell phone and anything else in your pockets. Some courts go one step further and allow the police to search the contents of your cell phone, like text messages, call logs, emails, and other data stored on your phone, without a warrant.23 Other courts disagree, and require the police to seek a warrant.24 It depends on the circumstances and where you live.
                        Q: The police pulled me over while I was driving. Can they search my cell phone?
                        A: Maybe. If the police believe there is probably evidence of a crime in your car, they may search areas within a driver or passenger's reach where they believe they might find it - like the glove box, center console, and other "containers."25 Some courts have found cell phones to be "containers" that police may search without a warrant.26
                        Q: Can the police search my computer or portable devices at the border without a warrant?
                        A: Yes. So far, courts have ruled that almost any search at the border is "reasonable" - so government agents don't need to get a warrant. This means that officials can inspect your computer or electronic equipment, even if they have no reason to suspect there is anything illegal on it.27 An international airport may be considered the functional equivalent of a border, even if it is many miles from the actual border.28
                        Q: Can the police take my electronic device away from the border or airport for further examination without a warrant?
                        A: At least one federal court has said yes, they can send it elsewhere for further inspection if necessary.29 Even though you may be permitted to enter the country, your computer or portable device may not be.
                        snip

                        https://www.eff.org/wp/know-your-rights

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Just wondering, what do you keep on your flashdrives?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by fuzygrub View Post
                            Just wondering, what do you keep on your flashdrives?
                            Vehicle, medical and weapons manuals. Maps. Gardening, harvesting, food prep, and water purification info. Hunting and Trapping articles, as well as basic orienteering information. A copy of the Constitution, and Thomas Paines "Common Sense" among other stuff.

                            Like I said, I keep a hard copy of everything printed off, but I have often found it handy to have an electronic backup, when away from home.
                            The 12ga.... It's not just for rabbits anymore.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Other that my laptop, I use very little tech. I do have a garmin gps but only use while hiking and backpacking. I like to have hard copies of books, manuals etc... I hate cell phones! I used to have one for work, but no longer need one. I don't miss it at all! I fear that things which are too dependent on networks and electricity may be of limited or little value if an event occurs.

                              I don't have a problem with anyone who uses a lot of tech, it just ain't my thing.

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