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  • Bug Out bags

    I know there are many Sling bags, and packs on the market. I am curious if anyone has a recommendation on a pack, or EDC bag that is of quality, enough room, and priced right

  • #2
    I have a small blackhawk backpack and a Maxpedition Mongo Versapck. The versapack is a sling type bag. It is a great bag and has a special section for your handgun. The importnat thing is to try different styles and see what works for you. Spend the extra money to get quality bags and avoid the china made knock offs that will only last 6 months to a year if you are lucky.
    Anyone that would give up freedom for security, deserves neither. ~ Ben Franklin

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    • #3
      I have tried several bags. I found the velcro closures allow stuff to fall out versus zippered pockets. Also what seemed like a modest sized bag weighed 25lbs. when I filled it with as much as it could hold. It became unusable for daily carry at that weight.

      I settled on using a lunch bag from our campus book store. It has our college logo on it, so it blends in nicely, and it is small enough to actually carry without wearing a divot in my shoulder.

      So, I just re-read the title and realized you were asking about Bug out Bags, which need to carry much more stuff than a Get Home Bag. For that I use an 80 liter internal frame backpack.
      Last edited by Mangler; 02-02-2015, 08:00 PM.
      If it was man made it can be man re-made.

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      • #4
        OK let talk from experience of walk with a pack weighing in at over 60 lbs for days at a time.

        1. The US Marines gave me my first back pack called the LC-1 - it is a ALICE Back Pack (Large) with frame. You can carry over 80 pounds with it. It has one main pocket with 6 outer pockets. The frame is Aluminium and nylon the pack is nylon with straps and snaps. Cost about $65.00.

        2. The other US Marine Pack was developed in 2002 when they needed equipment to use for mountain warfare in the middle-east. It was developed by a well known mountain backpack company. This bag can handle well over 100 pounds. It has an internal support system so NO FRAME. You can get one on E-Bay for about $190.00

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        • #5
          I have had the best performance from a North Face. Very durable. Heavy zippers and seams. Nice compartments inside and out to organize gear. I believe the model I have is called the Heckler. Modest size. Probably better as a Get Home Bag than a Bug Out Bag just due to size. Reasonably priced.

          Another brand I would recommend is Kelty. Very durable. Many sizes to choose from. Comfortable to carry. Mine is more of a BOB or INCH bag. A little more expensive, but worth it.

          A brand I have had bad luck with is Jansport. The pack I had literally came apart at the seams. It did not last a year. They have a life time warranty, and they did replace it for free, but a warranty won't do you much good if it falls apart when TSHTF.
          The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

          Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
            OK let talk from experience of walk with a pack weighing in at over 60 lbs for days at a time.

            1. The US Marines gave me my first back pack called the LC-1 - it is a ALICE Back Pack (Large) with frame. You can carry over 80 pounds with it. It has one main pocket with 6 outer pockets. The frame is Aluminium and nylon the pack is nylon with straps and snaps. Cost about $65.00.

            2. The other US Marine Pack was developed in 2002 when they needed equipment to use for mountain warfare in the middle-east. It was developed by a well known mountain backpack company. This bag can handle well over 100 pounds. It has an internal support system so NO FRAME. You can get one on E-Bay for about $190.00

            I have the Marine ILBE and it is a great pack. You can carry big loads for long distances. It is definitely worth the money. You can look around and find them used in like new condition for around $125.00, thats what I paid for mine anyway. If you live in a urban area, I would suggest a cover for it in a neutral color though. Anything that looks military or camo'd will draw unwanted attention. I want to look like any other person walking down the street. I do not want anyone to think that I have it going on and I am loaded down with stuff that they would like to have. Thats why, in a lot of ways, a civilian back pack is a better choice if you can find one that meets your needs
            Anyone that would give up freedom for security, deserves neither. ~ Ben Franklin

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            • #7
              Thought about revisiting this thread after adding a couple more packs to my collection. Size is important but so is the fit. Internal frame versus external frame; there's a cost relationship. The lower cost external frame packs are usually more comfortable and will carry as much or more than a similar priced internal frame. Once you get to the high end bags, the fit and capacity have been engineered better so there really isn't a trade off. Internal frame packs are easier to move around (shuffle in a vehicle, stow in a trunk, etc.). Also consider top load versus front load. Top load packs allow you to pack more but front load allow you quicker and easier access; top loads are usually more weather resistant. Most true military packs are very durable with large storage capacity but also will attract more attention. I have both types (internal and external frame) and use them differently. For me I've found the flexibility and capability of the external frames give me a wider range of applications I can use the packs for. Not just for carrying my bug out supplies, but I can also convert them into cargo haulers by removing the pack and using just the frame. For the wife and kids, they have internal frame packs that are fitted for their sizes, while I have an external frame as my primary extended pack.
              Si Vis Pacem, Para Bellum

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              • #8
                The only thing I have not talked about is moving thru the deep woods, brush, and in the mountains with packs.

                The external frame is great for long haul packing over easy traveled paths. When using the same pack and frame in brush, deep woods and in the mountains you will have problems of the pack snagging with tree and brush limbs. This is due to the space between your back (frame) and the pack it's self. If traveling thru such country (along river banks) you need a internal frame pack.

                The internal frame pack sits next to the back and the brush will normally swipe along the side and not get tangled up with the pack. It also works a lot better in the mountains where wind can be a major factor.

                With the experience the Marine Corps learned in the Middle East, is why they now have a very good pack.

                If I have one choice to use it would be the ILBE pack made for the USMC.

                One other note. If you have a large pack does not mean you have to fill it all the way up.

                Experiment by using a 35 lbs pack for 4 hours and a 60 lbs pack for 4 hours. Tell us the difference. Then remember you will be moving with it 8-10 hours a day for a minimum of 3 days.

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                • #9
                  The US Army has been issuing a Medium Ruck for a while now. You could say I've had a lot of experience with it. It's a great alternative to the full size Ruck when you don't need to take everything you have been issued. It holds up great to all conditions, frame is easy to mount, pack holds a lot of weight, and is comfortable for miles with a considerable mount of weight as well. Here is the correct information on it if you are interested in looking it up.

                  MOLLE II Medium Rucksack, RFI Issue, MultiCam (OCP), NSN 8465-01-585-1512

                  If you copy and paste the above wording, you will find it.

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                  • #10
                    With the recent change in my work location I have been able to go in an entirely different direction. My Get-Home-Bag is a glorified lunch box. It is a soft sided small bag I picked up at Cabella's, on sale. I would consider it one of the best buys I ever made. It looks like lunch. Kids carry them all the time. It has a shoulder strap if needed.

                    My logic is no matter what happens I will be going home to get my wife and son before I go anywhere else. The probability of me going anywhere without them is infinitesimal. I am seldom more than 15 minutes from my house. So, I carry what I feel is necessary, and will get the rest when I get home. I keep it in the car all the time, and I feel completely safe.
                    The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

                    Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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                    • #11
                      SIDE QUESTION: I have an extra credit assignment where students weigh their backpacks and keep track/calculate how far they travel in an average day, in order to compare themselves to a Roman soldier. From a video's brief description we have the info that a Roman soldier would have carried 60 lbs. and walked 24 miles/day.

                      I had a few students take me up on this and told them I'd ask at a website I visit, where there are a lot of current/former military folks, to see what modern soldiers carry and how far they are expected to go/day.

                      Any info you all have on that would be greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance.
                      Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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                      • #12
                        Schned: The military (USMC/Army) have two different ways of determining what they carry.

                        The Army has a lot of vehicles mostly armored for combat. The Marines do not. The Marines expect you to carry all you will need for a minimum of 5-7 days. The Army uses rucksacks for a 72 hour assault pack with additional supplies/needs brought forward via vehicle transport.

                        Hell the Marines are still using mules for transport in Afghanistan!!!! The Army gave that up in 1920..Today they use helicopters for most resupply in the field.

                        Best bet is get a 30 litter back pack with waist belt (Keeps the weight off your lower back) and carry it a few times loaded with your bug out bag gear. Remember not all bags are made the same.

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                        • #13
                          Schned - think you'll find a lot carrying rucks in the 80-90+ range. I can't speak to the combat side but if you look whats happening in the 'stan they are humping those kinds of loads several miles but the bigger challenge is the elevations they are doing it at and the slope inclines they are going up. But why walk when you can ride?

                          As Rich said military is going back to donkeys in the mountains and Army has a cavalry section i believe part of the 10th Mountain Div doing it. I believe mostly for spec war operators. a few 1000 years of the people in those regions using them to get around can't be wrong. lots of areas over there aren't easily accessible to choppers due to the elevations, steepness of the terrain and the wind gusts.
                          I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
                            Schned: The military (USMC/Army) have two different ways of determining what they carry.

                            The Army has a lot of vehicles mostly armored for combat. The Marines do not. The Marines expect you to carry all you will need for a minimum of 5-7 days. The Army uses rucksacks for a 72 hour assault pack with additional supplies/needs brought forward via vehicle transport.

                            Hell the Marines are still using mules for transport in Afghanistan!!!! The Army gave that up in 1920..Today they use helicopters for most resupply in the field.

                            Best bet is get a 30 litter back pack with waist belt (Keeps the weight off your lower back) and carry it a few times loaded with your bug out bag gear. Remember not all bags are made the same.


                            the DOD started purchasing Missouri bred mules and pack goods way back when for the Afghan insurgents fighting the Russian invasion - they still had mules in WW2 for sure in Burma & China - possibly Korea in the 1950s .... the first Special Forces going into Afghanistan rode native horses along with the insurgents ....

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                            • #15
                              I remember seeing Marines being taught to ride. Funny as hell. I worked part time as a cowboy in Yuma for 6 months. Still is funny to remember.

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