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  • how to cook from scratch,

    Throughout my life, I have been on the move never letting to much grass grow.
    I never did learn to cook, much less cooking with raw meterials such as whole grain that needs to be ground ect.
    Thereby the reason for this, I would like any/all information on how to cook from scratch, meaning taking whole grain and plants from the garden ect and making a meal.

  • #2
    Well tbk to start with i suggest making some fried corn bread and simple flour bread. Fried corn bread can be made by simply mixing water and corn meal until it is smooth. Then cook one or two tablespoons at a time on a greased hot frying pan, you don't need alot of oil. Flour bread is made same way just mix flour and water until thick and smooth. Then pour all of it onto a slightly greased frying pan and cook slowly. Use self rising meal and flour. This will let you make two easy breads, even over a camp fire.

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    • #3
      That fried corn bread sure goes good with some homemade bean soup,with some ham hocks and green onions,a little hot sauce ............ man that's a meal! That flour bread ( we always called it fried biscuits ) is some good eating too. I'd suggest going to some yard sale and picking up some cook books,most of the time they're cheap and an easy way to learn to cook. Or just piss your better half off real good, you'll either learn to cook or go hungry. I have several older cook books from the 40's and 50's I've picked up at sales and I would highly recommend trying to find some from that era simply because in a SHTF situation they have a lot of info that your newer books wont. Back then a lot of folks still raised thier own farm animals for meat and the cook books would tell how to prepare fresh meat all the way from slaughter to simmering. Most books back then dealt with fresh game also.
      Every Day , Is A Bonus.

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      • #4
        This is what I like about this site, stright, good information with no BS! I had asked the same question on another site and got a bunch of BS, like" who are you trying to kid not knowing how to cook" ect. I drove a semi for 25 years and between that and doing a couple of hitches in the Army, never had a need to learn.
        Thank you for this info and will look for further to come.

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        • #5
          there is a very good series on youtube.com that is movies from an old woman who lived during the depression and she cooks the simple dishes that they made when they didn't have much to work with. Just go to youtube.com and type "depression cooking with Clara" into the search box and a big group of her movies will be available to watch.
          Mike

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          • #6
            Originally posted by firemanphob View Post
            there is a very good series on youtube.com that is movies from an old woman who lived during the depression and she cooks the simple dishes that they made when they didn't have much to work with. Just go to youtube.com and type "depression cooking with Clara" into the search box and a big group of her movies will be available to watch.
            Mike
            Thank you very much, I will definatly check it out.

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            • #7
              also a good thing to get would be a couple of good cast iron pans, they can go on the campfire/stovetop or in the oven. And when seasoned properly and properly cared for they will be virtually "non-stick".
              A lot otimes you can find some at flea markets and yard sales, they just need a good cleaning and seasoning.

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              • #8
                Yes definitely get cast iron cookware for your BOL. Regular stove cookware does not cook as evenly over red hot coals. Now if you are relatively safe at your BOL I would premake a solar oven and then using the previously mentioned cast iron cookware( hopefully you got a dutch oven) you can put food in the solar oven in the late morning(around 10am) and by supper time it will be fully cooked. The internal temperature of the solar oven can reach 375 degrees. The dutch oven will cook your food like a crock pot, mmmm mmmmm good. Another thing that you can do with a dutch oven that many people are not aware of... you can bake bread in a dutch oven!!!!!! I think that I posted a DIY for making a solar oven if not then I will post it in next few days. Just think. You will be able to put food on to cook and then do other things critical to your survival while it cooks.

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                • #9
                  I don't have any good from scratch recipes. I just know if you have a fire that you can roast anything in tin foil, boil anything in a can and fry anything on a stick. BON APETIT!
                  SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE

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                  • #10
                    And don't forget nakadnu the old indian standby of wrapping your fish in leaves then putting mud/clay around it and place on the edge of your fire. Works great and the fish comes out flaky and tender.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by cbprice797 View Post
                      And don't forget nakadnu the old indian standby of wrapping your fish in leaves then putting mud/clay around it and place on the edge of your fire. Works great and the fish comes out flaky and tender.
                      Had not heard of this method, but will try it, Thank you. I have in the past, wrapped corn on the cob in foil with alot of butter and thrown them on the fire and enjoy it.

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                      • #12
                        I watched a show about feral animals in Australia. These 2 aboriginal women cornered a cat and clubbed it to death. They threw the cat in the fire and cooked it whole. When it was done they ate the whole thing. They did not skin it or gut it, they just cooked it and ate it.

                        I have cooked corn on the cob by putting the corn still in the husk right on the coals. When the husks begin to blacken and smolder they are done. Comes out a bit dry but good.
                        SQUARE PEG IN A ROUND HOLE

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by nakadnu View Post
                          I watched a show about feral animals in Australia. These 2 aboriginal women cornered a cat and clubbed it to death. They threw the cat in the fire and cooked it whole. When it was done they ate the whole thing. They did not skin it or gut it, they just cooked it and ate it.

                          I have cooked corn on the cob by putting the corn still in the husk right on the coals. When the husks begin to blacken and smolder they are done. Comes out a bit dry but good.
                          If you soak the corn (husks and all) for a while, usually many hours, if not over night, in salt water, then drain and grill, it wont be so dry. Sweet corn is the shizz like this! The butter, yeah, butter not margarine, salt and pepper.. I use Kosher salt just because I like the taste and have a ton of it!
                          If the zombies chase us, Im tripping you!!!

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                          • #14
                            somewhere around here I have my great grandmothers cookbooks. the ones written by her mom and grandmother LOL most of them start with " first catch chicken, pig, goat etc... " but everything in them were totally from scratch things. Ill look around and post some when I can find them.

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                            • #15
                              Go to your grain elevator / feed store and get a 50lb bag of corn .... food grade if they have it, feed corn if they don't .... the difference is minimal. Take a cup or two of the corn and place it in a frying pan over medium heat until it browns. You can eat it as is or grind it and you'll have pinole.

                              http://stealthsurvival.blogspot.com/...ds-pinole.html

                              http://www.nomeatathlete.com/tarahum...-chia-recipes/


                              Or we can make some hominy. Save the wood ash from your stove .... get two 5 gal buckets and one lid. Set one bucket on the floor, place the lid on it .... set the second bucket on top of the lid. Drill a 1/4 inch hole through the bottom of the top bucket and through the lid of the bottom bucket. Fill the top bucket with wood ash .... boil some water, about 3 gal. Pour the boiling water into the bucket full of ash.

                              The boiling water will leach the wood ash and create lye in the bottom bucket. Let this set for a couple of days, then pour of the water from the bottom bucket into a stainless steel or cast iron pot .... NOT ALUMINUM. Place a couple of cups of corn into the lye water and bring to a boil then allow to simmer until the corn is tender ....
                              Have another bucket of clean water handy .... you might want to do all this outside.

                              Dump the cooked corn into the clean water bucket and stir the corn around a bit to get the hulls loose .... get some more clean water and repeat the process .... about three times. When the hulls are all washed away and clean the corn is ready to eat. You can dry this and eat em crunchy or grind them. Here are some instructions http://paleoplanet69529.yuku.com/top...ke-Hominy.html

                              Have fun.

                              O.W.
                              Last edited by Oscar Wilde; 05-22-2011, 04:49 AM.
                              Things are seldom what they seem.

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