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  • Pocket Fire Kit

    This took about 20 minutes to make. Make one for every member of your family, heck make it a craft project!
    This kit is about 3"X3/4" a very handy size.
    Obtain a York Mint candy tin or simular tin that snaps closed.
    Melt a plumber's candle or simular; retrieve the wick and cut into 1" leangths.
    Fill the lid of the candy tin half full of melted wax, place several 1" wicks in the liquid wax and wait till it solidifys. In the body of the candy tin place tinder, matches and fuel, in this case pine sap. You now have everything needed to start a fire and a candle too boot!
    Wrap tin with cord and tape to keep it closed if needed.
    Attached Files
    Last edited by kenno; 10-14-2008, 04:43 PM.
    The road to serfdom is paved with free electric golf carts.

  • #2
    very nice i like it alot!!! Well done
    WHAT IF THE AMERICA YOU KNEW, WAS ABOUT TO CHANGE?

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    • #3
      Good call, anyone ever made homemade candles?
      Perfer et obdura; dolor hic tibi proderit olim.
      ~ Be patient and tough; some day this pain will be useful to you.-Ovid

      Mus uni non fidit antro.
      ~ A mouse does not rely on just one hole.-Plautus

      Non semper erit aestas
      ~ It will not always be summer.

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      • #4
        I have melted down old candles and with new or reclaimed wicks have made new candles. You can buy wicks at a craft store or use pieces of old cotton, linen fabric.
        Melt wax in Teflon coated pan (easy clean-up).
        Coat container or mold with veg. oil as a release agent.
        Pour into container and suspend wick with wire or tape, let cool.
        If wax does not release from container heat with hot water till candle releases.
        I do not like scented candles, they tend to smoke and stink in enclosed places.
        The road to serfdom is paved with free electric golf carts.

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        • #5
          Kenno, could you sacrifice one to test how long it will burn? I have tended to buy the 36 hour Coughlan triple wick cans but they are rather large. Fine for a pack but not appropriate for the small kits. If yours comes close I might break out the old candles and make a few.

          I've heard there is something called a plumbers candle that burns for a LONG time. Though I have never found anyone who knows what this is referring to so I can't confirm or deny.

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          • #6
            As I now understand it a plumbers candle is made from pure parafin wax which is denser than most candle wax which has oil added, most candle wax melts at 185 degrees while parafin wax melts at 390 degrees. Candels burn faster at warmer temps and slower at cold temps so an accurate comparison may be difficult. A product called soy wax (soywaxusa.com) supposedly burns 50% longer than parafin wax. I'll see if I can locate some parafin,weigh it before making the candle and do a burn test, but don't hold your breath, I'll have to drive into town to buy the Parafin wax!
            Last edited by kenno; 10-26-2008, 03:14 PM. Reason: new info
            The road to serfdom is paved with free electric golf carts.

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            • #7
              Hey, thanks. I have been wondering about that. The link you have doesn't seem to work for me but I will do some searches for parafin candles or wax.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by kenno View Post
                I have melted down old candles and with new or reclaimed wicks have made new candles. You can buy wicks at a craft store or use pieces of old cotton, linen fabric.
                Melt wax in Teflon coated pan (easy clean-up).
                Coat container or mold with veg. oil as a release agent.
                Pour into container and suspend wick with wire or tape, let cool.
                If wax does not release from container heat with hot water till candle releases.
                I do not like scented candles, they tend to smoke and stink in enclosed places.

                Back when I was in my teens and very poor, but still into Survivalism, I used to make candles out of my brothers crayons melted in a coffee can. I would use cotton string tie it to a pencil, drill a small hole in a penny and then pull the string through the penny and drop it into the can full of melted crayons. I would tie the other end onto the pencil and lay it accross the can. Let the melted wax cool, trim the cotton string and put the coffee can lid on. I remember them lasting forever.

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