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DIY Poison Ivy Treatments

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  • DIY Poison Ivy Treatments

    These are for a mild allergic reaction. More info at the site.

    http://www.chiff.com/a/poison-ivy.htm

    Oatmeal - Simply boil up the oatmeal in water as you normally would. Let it cool for a few minutes, then apply warm to the effected area, Ideally, the mixture should be applied until a thick layer forms. It will harden as it dries. Most sufferers swear by this treatment, which is sometimes combined with a tablespoon or two of baking soda for extra relief from itch and oozing.

    Baking soda - This treatment has also become a classic homemade cure, made by mixing 3 teaspoons of baking soda with 1 teaspoon of water until a thick paste forms. Apply to the rash and let dry. Another tried-and-true method for many poison ivy sufferers is full immersion in a soothing baking soda bath.

    Vinegar - Just sprinkle liberally on rash or blisters for instant relief from itch.
    Although the smell may not be to everybody's liking, vinegar seems to help draw out the "poison" from poison ivy while it also helps healing. White distilled vinegar, or apple cider vinegar, seem to work best.

    Banana peel - Touted by many as a homemade "miracle cure", the inside of a banana peel rubbed on poison ivy rashes seems to bring instant, cooling relief.

    By some accounts, banana skins may even do the trick when all other poison ivy treatment fails.

    Aloe Vera gel - A logical alternative, aloe vera is known to heal minor skin cuts and bring relief from sunburn, so apply liberally to effected areas to help sooth the itch and aid in healing.

    Dishwashing liquid - Perhaps the most practical treatment of all, dishwashing liquid's anti-grease agents make it a common-sense remedy for poison ivy when applied liberally from the bottle at full strength. Simply wash off with cool water.

  • #2
    Also a plant that grows nearby most poison ivy will help, it's called jewel weed, or touch me not
    All that is gold does not glitter, nor all who wander are lost

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    • #3
      Originally posted by lailr View Post
      Also a plant that grows nearby most poison ivy will help, it's called jewel weed, or touch me not
      I grow Jewel weed just for the poison ivy. I get it if I am 5 feet from it. I may try some of Oz's remedys tho since they might be easier and quicker.
      Your opponet got stronger today, did you?
      {{unswydd-Of One Purpose}}

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      • #4
        Jewel weed, Unswydd? Will look that guy up!

        Thx, Lost! I copied these to my "book" because we have a gdaughter who is severely allergic to poison oak and ivy.
        "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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        • #5
          great info, thanks!

          Unswydd, my daughter is the exact same way- I swear, if she just LOOKS at poison ivy, she's got it.
          "Be Excellent to Each Other"

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          • #6
            Lye soap

            Lye soap has always worked for me. Wash with it several times daily. Should be gone in a day or two.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by ashelocoa View Post
              Lye soap has always worked for me. Wash with it several times daily. Should be gone in a day or two.
              Where on earth do you get lye soap?
              "If Howdy Doody runs against him, I'm voting for the puppet." - SkyOwl's Wife, 2012

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              • #8
                Lye soap source

                I usually get it at Rendevous and historical encampments, but several sources are available on the web: http://www.jas-townsend.com/ being a personal favorite. I've never made it myself, but it's on my winter project list. As soon as Vermonters' fire up their woodstoves I'll have a limitless supply fo hardwood ashes! :) I wish I had a few websites that show the making of it as it's not complicated. Most of my information is from books and personal interaction with those making it. A quick search I'm sure will yield countless sites...

                For the most part you combine a warm lye solution with warm melted tallow and stir. It soaponifies as you stir, then is poured into a lined pan. Cut into blocks after it cools, allow to cure two to four weeks, then seperate blocks from pan, wrap, and store. Very little investment of materials yields a LOT of mild, effective soap. It doesn't lather like commercial soap but is just as effective and doesn't dry the skin out so bad.

                Good luck!

                PS If you do end up at an encampment haggleing over soap, try not to ask questions like "Is that a real fire?", "Is that chicken over the fire real?", or "Did you actually sleep here last night?". :D

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