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How To Set Up a Clothesline

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  • How To Set Up a Clothesline

    http://www.ehow.com/how_2242952_set-...thes-line.html

    With energy prices climbing and concern for the environment on virtually everyone’s mind, maybe it’s time to rethink and recycle some old ideas about how we dry our clothes. The sun and the wind will still do a fine job of drying our clothes--just like they’ve done for centuries--and you won't use any nonrenewable energy (plus as an added bonus, your clothes will come back smelling fresh as all outdoors--not some manufacturer’s perfumed version of outdoor freshness). Putting up a clothesline isn’t hard--and within a weekend you can start saving money and enjoying naturally fresh-smelling clothes. Here is how to do it...

    Figure out what kind of clothesline you want. An umbrella clothesline has some advantages in that it doesn’t take up a lot of room (which makes it a good choice for a small yard) and can be installed so it’s removable. The old fashioned T-bar clothesline requires more space, but has the advantage of allowing more air movement through your clothes; so they dry faster.

    Step2 Plan on installing your clothesline away from overhanging wires and trees to avoid bird droppings and tree sap. Also try to stay away from walking paths or gardening areas.

    Step3 Call before you dig. Installing your clothesline will require you to dig at least one (umbrella stand) or perhaps two holes, so be sure to contact your local utilities (cable, phone, water, power) to mark where their services run on your property before you start digging.

    Step4 Dig a hole at least 3 feet deep using your shovel or posthole digger. This will provide good solid support and if you live in an area where the ground freezes in winter, it will get you down below the "frost line" so you won’t need to worry about your clothesline shifting when the ground thaws.

    Step5 Pour a bag of posthole cement into the hole, add water (follow the instructions on the bag) and place your clothesline post into the hole.

    Step6 Use your level to make sure the post is straight (plumb), then brace it in place and allow the cement to dry overnight. Finish your clothesline by installing your clothesline pulleys and the clothesline itself.

    How to Build Clothesline T-Bars
    Step1 Measure to the center of the 3-foot crosspieces.

    Step2 Center a piece of 4x4 on that mark and then mark both edges.

    Step3 Use your power saw (set to 1 1/2-inch depth) to make a series of parallel cuts between the markings, then remove the waste wood.

    Step4 Set the (now notched) crosspiece on top of your pole and fasten it in place using carriage bolts driven down through the top of the crosspiece into the beam.

    Tips & Warnings
    It’s a good idea to install a clothesline tightener to a regular clothesline. This is an inexpensive metal bracket that fits between the lines and stops them from drooping under the weight of the clothes and dragging clothes on the ground.

    Pressure-treated wood, cedar or redwood are all good choices for your clothesline since they will resist the weather.

    Try to position your finished clothesline so it’s about 2 or 3 inches above the head of the person who uses it most. At that height they won’t have to be constantly reaching well above their heads to hang clothes.

  • #2
    Hey Oz! Good post. I have always used a clothes line. I love the way my sheets and towels smell. I don't use it for things like socks and tshirts that need to be put back in place tho. But skivies, towels, sheets, jeans and the like I use the line. Love it. Just have to be careful if you're mowing or you'll get "clotheslined" ! Har, Har.
    Your opponet got stronger today, did you?
    {{unswydd-Of One Purpose}}

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    • #3
      Originally posted by unswydd View Post
      Hey Oz! Good post. I have always used a clothes line. I love the way my sheets and towels smell. I don't use it for things like socks and tshirts that need to be put back in place tho. But skivies, towels, sheets, jeans and the like I use the line. Love it. Just have to be careful if you're mowing or you'll get "clotheslined" ! Har, Har.
      Did you say SKIVIES?.. well Semper Fi and a bag of chips....:D
      "And with a collection of minds and talent, they survived"

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      • #4
        Hanging clothing on the Clothesline smell a lot fresher than the dryer.
        The UV light from the sun kills Oder smelling bacteria, UV lights are installed in some HVAC duct systems, mostly for people with respiratory and/or low immune system.
        direct UV lights on your body is hazarous to your health and eyes.
        In my lumpy chair

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        • #5
          Here's some good info on UV light, basically just open the blinds and windows and let the sunshine in. Fm 21-76 and other FMs for personal hygiene calls it a sun bath.

          This may help reduce the risk of today's existing bio hazard.

          Chemical scents are bad for you and IAQ. If you smell that bad; take a bath!


          http://www.americanairandwater.com/uv-facts/health.htm
          In my lumpy chair

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