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Natural Disaster: Hurricane 101

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  • Natural Disaster: Hurricane 101

    Hurricane Prep 101

    Although the majority of you are probably developing preparations for the long anticipated socio-economic collapse, you are far more likely to be faced with a natural disaster as a test of your preps.

    As the severe weather season barrels down us again it is time to take stock of what we should be doing in preparation for a Hurricane strike. Although many folks do not live directly in the path of even the strongest hurricane, a category 5 beast will hurl torrential rains inland from the gulf and eastern seaboards as far inland as the Smokies and the Ohio River Valley, causing significant flooding and associated turmoil.

    If you are reading this, you probably consider yourself a prepper/survivalist on some level; you may even think that you do not need to prepare specifically for a Hurricane. This article is intended to serve as a basic guide to the necessary minimum preparation to ensure you and your family comes through the event and the aftermath with what you need to continue living- that is whole purpose of survival and prepping- to continue living. The preparation and checklists provided in this article are basic and if you live in Hurricane country, please feel free to share with your neighbors that may not be as prepared as you, if at all.

    NOTE: The majority of Hurricane preparedness is focused on EVACUATION (Bugout) and can be applied to any disaster that forces an individual or family to have to vacate their primary residence. Again, I know that many of you are prepared, this is for those that are not and is basic enough to be shared even with someone who thinks prepping is “foolish”; this is minimal preparation, but it has to start somewhere.
    LH




    Step 1: Get A Kit / "To-Go Bag" (Bug Out Bag, aka BOB)• Get an Emergency Supply Kit, which includes items like non-perishable food, water, a battery-powered or hand-crank radio, extra flashlights and batteries. You may want to prepare a portable kit and keep it in your car. This kit should include:
    o Copies of prescription medications and medical supplies;
    o Bedding and clothing, including sleeping bags and pillows;
    o Bottled water, a battery-operated radio and extra batteries, a first aid kit, a flashlight;
    o Copies of important documents: driver's license, Social Security card, proof of residence, insurance policies, wills, deeds, birth and marriage certificates, tax records, Passports, medical records, etc.
    NOTE: Place all important documents inside a waterproof container/case. A better idea is have duplicates in a second waterproof case in a different location. You should also have an itemized list of valuable household items for insurance
    • Make sure you have a "to-go bag" (BOB) ready in case you need to evacuate, include:
    o Water and non-perishable food;
    o Battery operated radio and batteries so you can get important information from local officials;
    o First aid kit;
    o Flashlight;
    o Maps
    o Important documents such as proof residence, pictures of your family including pets, insurance policies, and tax records;
    o Comfortable clothing and blankets;
    o Unique family needs such as prescription medications, pet supplies, infant supplies or any other unique need your family may have.
    NOTE 1: Store water in plastic containers or have bottled water. Avoid using containers that will decompose or break, such as milk cartons or glass bottles. A normally active person needs to drink at least two quarts of water each day. Hot environments and intense physical activity can double that amount. Children, nursing mothers, and ill people will need more.
    NOTE 2: Store one gallon of water per person per day.
    NOTE 3: Keep at least a three-day supply of water per person (two quarts for drinking, two quarts for each person in your household for food preparation/sanitation).
    NOTE 4: Store at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food. Select foods that require no refrigeration, preparation or cooking, and little or no water. If you must heat food, pack a can of sterno. Select food items that are compact and lightweight. Include a selection of the following foods in your Disaster Supplies Kit:
    o Ready-to-eat canned meats, fruits, and vegetables
    o Canned juices
    o Staples (salt, sugar, pepper, spices, etc.)
    o High energy foods
    o Vitamins
    o Food for infants
    o Comfort/stress foods

    NOTE 5: SANITATION: Toilet paper, towelettes, Soap, liquid detergent, Feminine supplies, Personal hygiene items, Plastic garbage bags, ties (for personal sanitation uses), Plastic bucket with tight lid, Disinfectant, Household chlorine bleach
    NOTE 6: Include at least one complete change of clothing and footwear per person. To include: Sturdy shoes or work boots, Rain gear, Blankets or sleeping bags, Hat and gloves, Thermal underwear, Sunglasses (preferably a pair that doubles as protective eyewear)
    NOTE 7: Every family member must have their own BOB or To-Go Bag/ do not put all your food & water in one bag- everyone carries some.

    Step 2: Make a Plan & Prepare your family
    • Make a Family Emergency Plan. Your family may not be together when disaster strikes, so it is important to know how you will contact one another, how you will get back together and what you will do in case of an emergency
    • Plan places where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
    • It may be easier to make a long-distance phone call than to call across town, so an out-of-town contact may be in a better position to communicate among separated family members.
    • You may also want to inquire about emergency plans at places where your family spends time: work, daycare and school. If no plans exist, consider volunteering to help create one.
    • Plan to Evacuate
    o Identify ahead of time where your family will meet, both within and outside of your immediate neighborhood.
    o Identify several places you could go in an emergency, a friend's home in another town, a motel or public shelter.
    o If you do not have a car, plan alternate means of evacuating.
    o If you have a car, keep a half tank of gas in it at all times in case you need to evacuate.
    o Take your Emergency Supply Kit.
    o Take your pets with you, but understand that only service animals may be permitted in public shelters. Plan how you will care for your pets in an emergency.
    • Take a Community Emergency Response Team (CERT) class from your local Citizen Corps chapter. Keep your training current.
    • Basic tools and supplies you may wish to consider in your planning: Mess kits, or paper cups, plates, and plastic utensils, Emergency preparedness manual, Battery-operated radio and extra batteries, Flashlight and extra batteries, Cash or traveler’s checks, change, Non-electric can opener, utility knife, Fire extinguisher: small canister ABC type, Tube tent, Pliers (multi-plier/Gerber/Leatherman), Tape (duct tape), Compass, Matches in a waterproof container, Aluminum foil, Plastic storage containers, Signal flares, Paper, pencil, Needles, thread, Medicine dropper, Shut-off wrench, to turn off household gas and water, Whistle, Plastic sheeting, Map of the area (for locating shelters)

    Step 3: Be Informed
    Familiarize yourself with the terms that are used to identify a hurricane.
    • A hurricane watch means a hurricane is possible in your area. Be prepared to evacuate. Monitor local radio and television news outlets or listen to NOAA Weather Radio for the latest developments.
    • A hurricane warning is when a hurricane is expected in your area. If local authorities advise you to evacuate, leave immediately.
    • Hurricanes are classified into five categories based on their wind speed, central pressure, and damage potential. Category Three and higher hurricanes are considered major hurricanes, though Categories One and Two are still extremely dangerous and warrant your full attention.
    Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Scale
    Scale Number (Category) Sustained Winds (MPH)
    1 74-95
    2 96-110
    3 111-130
    4 131-155
    5 More than 155
    • Hurricanes can produce widespread torrential rains. Floods are the deadly and destructive result. Slow moving storms and tropical storms moving into mountainous regions tend to produce especially heavy rain. Excessive rain can trigger landslides or mud slides, especially in mountainous regions. Flash flooding can occur due to intense rainfall. Flooding on rivers and streams may persist for several days or more after the storm.

    Prepare Your Home
    • Cover all of your home's windows with pre-cut ply wood or hurricane shutters to protect your windows from high winds.
    • Plan to bring in all outdoor furniture, decorations, garbage cans and anything else that is not tied down.
    • Keep all trees and shrubs well trimmed so they are more wind resistant.
    • Secure your home by closing shutters, and securing outdoor objects or bringing them inside.
    • Turn off utilities as instructed. Otherwise, turn the refrigerator thermostat to its coldest setting and keep its doors closed.
    • Turn off propane tanks.
    • Ensure a supply of water for sanitary purposes such as cleaning and flushing toilets. Fill the bathtub and other large containers with water.
    • Find out how to keep food safe during and after and emergency by visiting www.FoodSafety.gov.

    Prepare Your Business (talk to your boss about what their dsaster plan is)
    Plan to stay in business, talk to your employees, and protect your investment.
    • Carefully assess how your company functions, both internally and externally, to determine which staff, materials, procedures and equipment are absolutely necessary to keep the business operating.
    • Identify operations critical to survival and recovery.
    • Plan what you will do if your building, plant or store is not accessible.
    o Consider if you can run the business from a different location or from your home.
    o Develop relationships with other companies to use their facilities in case a disaster makes your location unusable.
    • Learn about programs, services, and resources at U.S. Small Business Administration.

    Listen to Local Officials
    Learn about the emergency plans that have been established in your area by your state and local government. In any emergency, always listen to the instructions given by local emergency management officials.
    NOTE: Do not snub your nose at the local LEO- follow evac instructions to the point where you can then move of your own accord to your final destination

    Federal and National Resources
    Find additional information on how to plan and prepare for a hurricane by visiting the following resources:
    • Federal Emergency Management Agency
    • NOAA Hurricane Center
    • American Red Cross
    • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Center for Disease Control

    Encourage Electronic Payments for Federal Benefit Recipients
    Keep in mind a disaster can disrupt mail service for days or even weeks. For those who depend on the mail for their Social Security benefits, a difficult situation can become worse if they are evacuated or lose their mail service – as 85,000 check recipients learned after Hurricane Katrina. Switching to electronic payments is one simple, significant way people can protect themselves financially before disaster strikes. It also eliminates the risk of stolen checks.
    The U.S. Department of the Treasury recommends two safer ways to get federal benefits:
    • Direct deposit to a checking or savings account is the best option for people with bank accounts. Federal benefit recipients can sign up by calling (800) 333-1795 or at www.GoDirect.org.
    • The Direct Express┬« prepaid debit card is designed as a safe and easy alternative to paper checks for people who don’t have a bank account. Sign up is easy – call toll-free at (877) 212-9991 or sign up online at www.USDirectExpress.com.
    Signing up for direct deposit or the Direct Express card is a simple but important step that can help protect your family’s access to funds in case the unthinkable were to happen. If you or those close to you are still receiving Social Security or other federal benefits by check, please consider switching to one of these safer, easier options today.


    This is not directed at anyone particular, but you do not want to caught short like so many folks were with Katrina… and then standing there with your hand out. Don’t be that person.

    Preparing for a Hurricane or other natural/ man-made disaster ahead of time will alleviate the chaos at landfall and inevitable confusion during the aftermath. Most folks I know will ride out up to a category 3, but above that will relocate, and that is the hardest thing to do. Many preppers/survivalists do not make plans to leave their primary residence, even on a temporary basis, and when preparing for a natural disaster, leaving your primary residence (and not knowing if it will be there when you return) is a primary consideration. Hurricane, Earthquake, Wildfire, Flood, Tornado, Tsunami, etc…

    “Should I stay or should I go now? If I go there will be trouble… An if I stay it will be double” – The Clash (Combat Rock, 1981)

    Long Hunter
    Last edited by Long_Hunter; 04-05-2011, 05:02 PM.

  • #2
    I know this is an older thread, but it is good to reinforce this as hurricane season is now aproching us. there are hurricanes forming on the atlantic now. this is very good info to remind us to be ready for these things. We will have to very soon start getting things ready just in case. most of it is, but will have to make sure we have tarps and things just incase.
    AJ

    Comment


    • #3
      To Apples point thought I'd bump this with the potential for Isaac to make a mess in FL and who knows where else...
      I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

      Comment


      • #4
        Well it looks like we need to get ready down here in Florida for #9 to joins us this weekend. We expect 50+ MPH winds and a lot of rain again. I was hoping that the soil would get a chance to dry out this weekend but no go this time.

        I will try to take some photos of how the stores looks when this storm hits close to home the Home Depot will be sold out of plywood within 24 hours once it gets close. Then the rush on the stores will begin. I will start a new thread for this storm reaction, and continue to update every 8 hours until I loose the power.

        Comment


        • #5
          Richfl stay safe and best of luck to you and yours. Will keep all of you in our prayers that all turns out well.
          AJ

          Comment


          • #6
            Good info., Applejack.

            I have scanned my insurance policies, licenses, permits, birth certificates, credit/debit cards, etc. and places them in a folder on a portable thumb drive. The drive is kept in a bag inside my vehicle, just in case.

            The National Incident Management System (NIMS) directive mandates that refuge locations develop pet shelters. Most shelters have no provision for pets, however, they are directed to make provision. We here in Lynchburg worked within a group that included two local vets, one of whom was involved in animal rescue and sheltering after Katrina. We have a plan now to shelter pets in one of our main shelters, and have acquired portable pet cages of various sizes and related supplies. Who would care for the pets? The owners, who will be sheltered in the same building!

            One more thing. I don't remember seeing it mentioned, but have CASH! Cash will be king.

            Oh, if you decide to evac. have someplace in mind to go. Motels/hotels as far in as 250 miles inland can fill of up really quick with tidewater residents ahead of a hurricane.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by jezcruzen View Post
              Good info., Applejack.

              I have scanned my insurance policies, licenses, permits, birth certificates, credit/debit cards, etc. and places them in a folder on a portable thumb drive. The drive is kept in a bag inside my vehicle, just in case.

              The National Incident Management System (NIMS) directive mandates that refuge locations develop pet shelters. Most shelters have no provision for pets, however, they are directed to make provision. We here in Lynchburg worked within a group that included two local vets, one of whom was involved in animal rescue and sheltering after Katrina. We have a plan now to shelter pets in one of our main shelters, and have acquired portable pet cages of various sizes and related supplies. Who would care for the pets? The owners, who will be sheltered in the same building!

              One more thing. I don't remember seeing it mentioned, but have CASH! Cash will be king.

              Oh, if you decide to evac. have someplace in mind to go. Motels/hotels as far in as 250 miles inland can fill of up really quick with tidewater residents ahead of a hurricane.
              My family is from Lynchburg. We are hoping to be up there this fall. I need to do the same with our important papers. Glad to here the pets will be well cared for. My middle granddaughter wants to be a vet.
              AJ

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by jezcruzen View Post
                Good info., Applejack.

                I have scanned my insurance policies, licenses, permits, birth certificates, credit/debit cards, etc. and places them in a folder on a portable thumb drive. The drive is kept in a bag inside my vehicle, just in case.
                You need to be smart about this, If your vehicle or the thumb drive gets stolen, can you say identity theft. If you are going to keep it in your vehicle, keep it where nobody would look.

                Will
                Last edited by wac220; 08-25-2012, 02:08 AM.
                CITIZEN by BIRTH
                AMERICAN by CHOICE
                NRA PATRON MEMBER by NECESSITY

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by wac220 View Post
                  You need to be smart about this, If your vehicle or the thumb drive gets stolen, can you say identity theft. If you are going to keep it in your vehicle, keep it where nobody would look.

                  Will
                  Good advice. It is encrypted, however, which should lesson the change of theft. I also have protection for that sort of thing.

                  Comment

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