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My "SINGLE" best advise........"HIDE"

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  • #61
    Special Forces taught its troopers many years ago, during guerrilla operations, to have 3 places to hide caches of goods and yourself. That way if one part of your goods and people got discovered you still had 2 parts of your stuff and people to use later. Hiding does not make you a coward. It makes you a cautious person.

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    • #62
      The first gun fight will be determined by a few factors.

      1. Are you proficient with your small arms? Not just target practice standing; but kneeling, sitting, laying down, moving towards, and moving away from the target.

      2. Where are you in comparison to targets. Behind a barrier, out walking, or driving, Each has its problems.

      3. Distance - outside 25 meters; it's hard to hit off hand with a pistol or shotgun.

      4. Weather conditions - rain, winds daytime, night time, etc.

      5. Location of family and friends. Always know where your rounds will go.

      6. Last but not least most important: have the mind set to use deadly force. Ready to initiate use, because: he who is ready will win!

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      • #63
        Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
        The first gun fight will be determined by a few factors.

        1. Are you proficient with your small arms? Not just target practice standing; but kneeling, sitting, laying down, moving towards, and moving away from the target.

        2. Where are you in comparison to targets. Behind a barrier, out walking, or driving, Each has its problems.

        3. Distance - outside 25 meters; it's hard to hit off hand with a pistol or shotgun.

        4. Weather conditions - rain, winds daytime, night time, etc.

        5. Location of family and friends. Always know where your rounds will go.

        6. Last but not least most important: have the mind set to use deadly force. Ready to initiate use, because: he who is ready will win!
        Great points. When I was assigned in Central America during the late 1980s, our commanding officer, BG Bernard Loeffke, would have us do all sorts of activities to as best as possible simulate combat. We would have to “stress fire” qualify that involved swimming 800 yards, doing push-up to exhaustion and sprinting to the firing line to qualify. And during qualifying pyrotechnics would be going off all around us. Our training before deploying to the Central and South American locations were always pretty intense, and all designed to stress us and make sure we could react and critically think while stressed. It’s not easy to simulate battlefield conditions, but effective training really makes a difference. All the training aside, your point number 6 I think is often the most important point of who lives and who dies. If you don’t have the will or the mindset to win, you probably won’t. Still, correct training is a huge multiplier.

        All that said, I plan to didi mao into the wilderness from my already remote location if the stuff gets to real. If the world turns to crap, a big part of survival will be an attrition game. You increase your odds if you let the others attrit themselves.

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        • #64
          Folks will have two basic situations to deal with, Pre-SHTF and Post SHTF. Each of these conditions require different responses and different mind sets. Top quality training and most importantly --- practice, will be important in all the situations.
          It is better to be a warrior in a garden, than a gardener in a war!

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          • #65
            Originally posted by tmttactical View Post
            Folks will have two basic situations to deal with, Pre-SHTF and Post SHTF. Each of these conditions require different responses and different mind sets.....
            Speaking "Only" for myself, there will not be any Post SHTF for me. So that is one less thing I have to prepare for...........both mentally and physically. Actually, I expect that I will hardly even know that the SHTF.

            My guess is, and it is only a guess, if you asked thousands of current preppers, "What is the worse that you can imagine you and your family's day to day existence looking like during a long term SHTF event in America"....??? I am currently and have been for decades choosing to live, a lifestyle far more yucky then they can imagine.

            One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

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            • #66
              Sourdough, you do live a life style that will not change post SHTF. You are isolated far from the maddening crowds and completely off grid. So for you, there really will not be much of a change. You actually do walk the walk, to the max. You are the 1 percent of prepper life style. For the other 99 percent, they will have to deal with a post SHTF to some degree, depending on their location. Categorizing by location there are the (A) Isolated Prepper --you and a few others, the 1 percent. (b) Rural preppers. (C) semi-rural -- small town / village folks -- non farmers / ranchers. (D) Suburbanites -- folks living on the outskirt of a major city. (E) Urbanites --- folks living in the cities. Only group (A) may not be affected post SHTF. The rest will have to decide how they are going to deal with the new situation. As preppers, I really hope they have figured out ahead of time what they will do and how they will get it done.
              It is better to be a warrior in a garden, than a gardener in a war!

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              • #67
                For those who are isolated but still on the grid (hooked up to electric utility), and it is absolutely Mad Max, SHTF, cities-going-nutz time... consider removing all evidence of your connection to the utility. I would imagine that desperate people will follow those power lines to remote (but connected) homesteads.
                Genius is making a way out of no way.

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                • #68
                  Originally posted by Sourdough View Post

                  Speaking "Only" for myself, there will not be any Post SHTF for me. So that is one less thing I have to prepare for...........both mentally and physically. Actually, I expect that I will hardly even know that the SHTF.

                  My guess is, and it is only a guess, if you asked thousands of current preppers, "What is the worse that you can imagine you and your family's day to day existence looking like during a long term SHTF event in America"....??? I am currently and have been for decades choosing to live, a lifestyle far more yucky then they can imagine.
                  I agree because so many people are prepping to maintain some degree of a reasonably comfortable lifestyle. I shake my head when I read of how much TOILET PAPER folks stock up. They are in for a crappy surprise, lol.

                  I know the value of living below most people's comfort levels. I call it "hardening," and have done it for many years, to one degree or another. But the real hardening is in the mind; to be mentally prepared for your absolute worst nightmares. In addition to maintaining strong spiritual health (which is extremely personal and has nothing to do with mainstream religion), I like to review historical accounts of long-standing sieges, famines, oppression, and wars which reveal a lot of things that most preppers are NOT prepared to deal with.

                  Advanced, deep preps should include mentally preparing for the worst that history has already shown, and developing a "survivor personality." When I read first-hand accounts of survivors of the Holocaust, sieges, famines, brutal POW camps, and oppression... I ask myself, what would I do? What are the common denominators among the survivors?

                  A good "cheat sheet" is the book, The Survivor Personality by Al Siebert, PhD. (A survivor personality can't be taught but it can be learned!) The book is based on more than 40 years of study of the survival phenomenon and provides insight into the qualities and habits shared by people who successfully cope with difficult situations. If a person does not have this trait, the book attempts to help you develop it. Although it is not written for severe SHTF situations, honing the survivor personality will be beneficial in all situations.

                  I almost didn't finish reading the book, because page after page covered traits I thought that I already had. But I am glad I finished it because of the last chapter, "Surviving Being a Survivor."

                  Other good books are Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why, by Laurence Gonzales, and Surviving the Extremes, by Kenneth Kamler. There are lots more in the Recommended Reading List in the back of Al Siebert's book.

                  Personally speaking, one of the most valuable things that have helped me to overcome extremely oppressive situations is knowing that spiritually, I can tap into a strength that is greater than what is normal, which has carried me through severe times when I felt pressed beyond movement with no way out.
                  Last edited by GrizzlyetteAdams; 01-21-2019, 05:13 PM.
                  Genius is making a way out of no way.

                  Comment


                  • #69
                    Originally posted by tmttactical View Post
                    Sourdough, you do live a life style that will not change post SHTF. You are isolated far from the maddening crowds and completely off grid. .
                    I am "NOT" completely off grid, nor do I want to be......now.

                    However there is little here other then the 12X24 foot one room shack that I live in. So my plan is to burn this place to the ground at the first indication of trouble that actually shows up here at my door......and then retreat deeper to pre-established locations.

                    Having stated the above.........I am at a point where I am going to be compelled to modify my plans......drastically. And that needs to be finished by this fall.

                    One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

                    Comment


                    • #70
                      GrizzlyetteAdams, you are absolutely right that the a hardened mindset is essential for survival. One must have a determined will to survive and already be hardened to the fact that things will suck. Don’t get me wrong, I’m hooked up to the grid. Might as well use it while we have it. But things will get hard and brutal real quick.

                      Thanks for for the tips on the books.

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                      • #71
                        Originally posted by GrizzlyetteAdams View Post

                        I agree because so many people are prepping to maintain some degree of a reasonably comfortable lifestyle. I shake my head when I read of how much TOILET PAPER folks stock up. They are in for a crappy surprise, lol.
                        We stock about 1000 rolls of toilet paper, give or take 200 or so as we use it.

                        The thing is, I have no illusions that toilet paper will run out eventually in a prolonged SHTF, as will a lot of other modern conveniences. But having the toilet paper gives us time to adjust slowly to what will be the new normal. A good 75% of what I prep for is to survive the initial die-off period where chaos is everywhere. If figure this period to be one to two years in length, and having those conveniences allows us to focus on those issues which are important during the chaos.

                        As the chaos dies (pun intended!), our focus will gradually shift as well.

                        Now one could argue that folks should figure out how to live without them now, but why? We don't need to live without them, and learning to do so would take our focus from other things that are also important.

                        I think there's a line between knowing how to do something, and being accustomed to doing it. I know how to filter water without modern devices, so why should I get used to doing it daily when its not needed?

                        If SHTF, I can get OJT (On the job training).. but if nothing ever happens, then I will have wasted my time and effort. And there's where my personal line is at. Make sure I have the resources (knowledge, books, etc) to figure it out, but don't bother putting it into practice until required to do so.

                        I know the value of living below most people's comfort levels. I call it "hardening," and have done it for many years, to one degree or another. But the real hardening is in the mind; to be mentally prepared for your absolute worst nightmares. In addition to maintaining strong spiritual health (which is extremely personal and has nothing to do with mainstream religion), I like to review historical accounts of long-standing sieges, famines, oppression, and wars which reveal a lot of things that most preppers are NOT prepared to deal with.

                        Advanced, deep preps should include mentally preparing for the worst that history has already shown, and developing a "survivor personality." When I read first-hand accounts of survivors of the Holocaust, sieges, famines, brutal POW camps, and oppression... I ask myself, what would I do? What are the common denominators among the survivors?

                        A good "cheat sheet" is the book, The Survivor Personality by Al Siebert, PhD. (A survivor personality can't be taught but it can be learned!) The book is based on more than 40 years of study of the survival phenomenon and provides insight into the qualities and habits shared by people who successfully cope with difficult situations. If a person does not have this trait, the book attempts to help you develop it. Although it is not written for severe SHTF situations, honing the survivor personality will be beneficial in all situations.

                        I almost didn't finish reading the book, because page after page covered traits I thought that I already had. But I am glad I finished it because of the last chapter, "Surviving Being a Survivor."

                        Other good books are Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why, by Laurence Gonzales, and Surviving the Extremes, by Kenneth Kamler. There are lots more in the Recommended Reading List in the back of Al Siebert's book.

                        Personally speaking, one of the most valuable things that have helped me to overcome extremely oppressive situations is knowing that spiritually, I can tap into a strength that is greater than what is normal, which has carried me through severe times when I felt pressed beyond movement with no way out.
                        I think people will be surprised at how adaptable humans are when their situation changes. The snowflakes who get offended at silly things, those who need their coffee fixed a certain way or they moan and complain, etc etc.. will most likely adjust quickly to their new situation. We humans are very adaptable, and while our physical adaptions can take a while, our mental adaptations are a couple magnitudes more flexible and much faster to react to changing environments.

                        This is one of the issues I see in the doomsday scenarios played out in various Hollywood style productions. They don't tend to credit the ability people have to change their mentality. I think people will die off because of physical limitations, (food, shelter, medical, etc). I doubt that mental limitations will play much of a part in it. But that's just my take.

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