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  • One of the things that we had happen during Hurricane IRMA was that TV and Radio frequencies were bouncing around.

    By day 2 we had only one radio station in Jacksonville still up and running Don't know about TV because we had no power. With TV all digital now, it is hard to get a signal with any type of antennae. Needs to be looked at.

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    • Originally posted by Zombie Axe View Post
      Me & my big mouth :p

      Basically some freqs and equipment I have in mind are as follows... note these are a note to myself and will elaborate on the as this progesses...

      First of all a standard FRS channel, cause everyone about has one of these. I envision something as a 'camp intercom' for any get togethers. Sure they don't have alot of range, but they are handy for close range commo

      CB, most folks have a CB. I will hafta fix mine but I propose a channel there for Xcolonists who have this equipment. With the proper antenna a CB can be more effective than a FRS.

      MURS, will leave that to you, but i need to get some equipment for this band :)

      Ham radio. Since the ham radio bands are numerous I would like to propose a few freqs and bands...

      First of all, 2m (144-148mhz) is one of the most popular ham bands out there. So we should have a simplex freq, as well as a repeater freq that covers our local areas... IOW a Xcolonist ham operator rolls into another town, he may be able to reach another Xcolonist ham :)

      20M (14mhz) great band for voice as well as digital modes like PSK31/mfsk16. So a voice freq around 14.300 mhz + or - a few khz as well as 14.070 for PSK31

      40M (7mhz) really great all around voice band (as well as CW) should have a voice freq here as well...

      Cellphone: a calling tree is an effective way to communicate if the telecom grid is intact.

      Email: Same thing for an email tree, lots easier to establish as someone does not hafta give up personal info, but depends totally on intact telecom and power grid to function...

      http://www.winlink.org/

      Winlink is an awesome way to send and receive email via manpackable HF rigs. I had a ham buddy in Idaho that regularly sent me emails from remote parts of that state. Works with the internet but can also be used from station to station if needed... Awesome technology but requires the slightly more expensive HF gear and a easily obtainable General class ham license as well as a HF radio modem and computer...

      Packet radio works alot like Winlink but on FM freqs. It uses a network of digipeaters as well as internet to 'fill in the holes'. Can be tied into local packet BBS's or setup as a private BBS. Can be used with an easy to get Technician Ham Radio License...

      Will reasearch some freqs later on... but that is enough to get the ball rolling :)
      I see it has been a while since this section of the thread has been discussed but it is a very important phase of the prepper process. Since then there has been some developments that make becoming a radio operator more desirable. One older development was a entry level to ham radio without knowing morse code, one which caused me to take the plunge many years ago. The "no-code" or Technician Class ticket. This limited one to use the VHF/UHF frequencies which limited the range of communications. However, with SSB transceivers and the right conditions one could still make a couple hundred mile contacts.

      As of a couple years ago the FCC opened up a portion of 10 meters (28 mhz) to Techs but the comms are no different that CB (11m) except one can run a couple hundred watts and be "legal". HA!

      Now, the ARRL is petitioning the FCC to open a portion of the lower bands, including 40 and 15 meters, to Techs which makes it VERY desirable to be a new HAM. This new class of privileges will make communicating among us preppers much easier. See link.

      http://www.arrl.org/news/arrl-reques...cian-licensees

      73, KC4YIH

      Comment



      • I'd like to know why someone that can build and create weapons and explosives is so radio inept. I've got it figured out and working out to around 25 miles (tested) but beyond that the equipment becomes Greek. I wonder if there's radio operations for dummies.

        Dale
        Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

        Comment


        • Originally posted by dalewick View Post
          I'd like to know why someone that can build and create weapons and explosives is so radio inept. I've got it figured out and working out to around 25 miles (tested) but beyond that the equipment becomes Greek. I wonder if there's radio operations for dummies.

          Dale
          What chu talkin bout Willis?

          Comment


          • Originally posted by Defcon09 View Post

            What chu talkin bout Willis?
            It's the technical aspects of the radios, like programming in channels, Figuring out frequencies on existing channels, What channels should I have and what works for me without the Ham lisc.

            My example is, I have a Baofeng UV-5R radio as well as 2 Motorola T-401 Talkabout radios (walki talkies) and I have been trying to figure out there frequencies and how to program those into my Baofeng. I'm wanting to use the Baofeng as a base unit for the Talkabout's. Can it be done?

            I should have taken the RTO cross training. Hindsight 20/20.

            Thanks Defcon09

            Dale
            Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

            Comment


            • Originally posted by dalewick View Post

              It's the technical aspects of the radios, like programming in channels, Figuring out frequencies on existing channels, What channels should I have and what works for me without the Ham lisc.

              My example is, I have a Baofeng UV-5R radio as well as 2 Motorola T-401 Talkabout radios (walki talkies) and I have been trying to figure out there frequencies and how to program those into my Baofeng. I'm wanting to use the Baofeng as a base unit for the Talkabout's. Can it be done?

              I should have taken the RTO cross training. Hindsight 20/20.

              Thanks Defcon09

              Dale
              Yea, I've seen comments from as many people who like those as those who don't. Programming difficulty. If you did not purchase the programming CD and cable you might want to get one, that may help, especially if you buy another radio. I believe you can download the second HT with what you have in the first one. Good luck.

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Defcon09 View Post

                Yea, I've seen comments from as many people who like those as those who don't. Programming difficulty. If you did not purchase the programming CD and cable you might want to get one, that may help, especially if you buy another radio. I believe you can download the second HT with what you have in the first one. Good luck.
                Thanks

                Dale
                Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

                Comment


                • I don’t have much time online lately but I’ve got some replies to the above.

                  I picked up a couple Baofengs when I’ve seen them dirt cheap at hamfests. They are decent for the money and I’d rather lose or damage one rather than one of my Yaesu HTs. Great for use while doing chores in the snow/ice/mud and chatting with my wife when she’s elsewhere on the property.

                  Anyhow, I didn’t find them tough to program at all. Certainly much easier than Yaesu with menus upon submenus and strange sequences of key presses to get there. Be patient and you will learn it quickly. There’s a guy online who makes easier-to-read guides which may help.

                  The frequencies of the Motorola should be in the user manual. If not then look it up online. I’m sure they are out there. If it’s a FRS//GMRS combo, then most likely the first 14 channels are FRS and the rest are GMRS. I’m not up to date on “bubble pack” features or frequencies but that’s my best guess based on older radios I’ve used.

                  Comment


                  • Originally posted by methusaleh View Post
                    I don’t have much time online lately but I’ve got some replies to the above.

                    I picked up a couple Baofengs when I’ve seen them dirt cheap at hamfests. They are decent for the money and I’d rather lose or damage one rather than one of my Yaesu HTs. Great for use while doing chores in the snow/ice/mud and chatting with my wife when she’s elsewhere on the property.

                    Anyhow, I didn’t find them tough to program at all. Certainly much easier than Yaesu with menus upon submenus and strange sequences of key presses to get there. Be patient and you will learn it quickly. There’s a guy online who makes easier-to-read guides which may help.

                    The frequencies of the Motorola should be in the user manual. If not then look it up online. I’m sure they are out there. If it’s a FRS//GMRS combo, then most likely the first 14 channels are FRS and the rest are GMRS. I’m not up to date on “bubble pack” features or frequencies but that’s my best guess based on older radios I’ve used.
                    Thank you! I'm learning, just slower than normal.

                    Dale
                    Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

                    Comment


                    • My thoughts on the matter....

                      1) Why do you need a license? - Because you need to practice to understand the principles and techniques (especially digital "burst" transmissions) during "peacetime" to be accomplished in an emergency. Monitoring a "squeal" does not get you there.

                      2) A good ham radio club will have a "field day" exercise that will allow you to set up your portable HF station and work the bugs out of communicating "on the move" (so to speak) legally. Most clubs have "fox hunts" that track down and turn in illegal transmitters and sources of interference on ham frequencies.

                      3) Ham radio operators with a license can join ARES/RACES to provide support in emergencies to local agencies. Contacts made and courses taken (mostly free to members) in the police, fire departments, and FEMA (and the state equivalents) will tune you in on what you can expect from them and are great sources of intel. You will be tuned in, and get a heads up, long before the general population gets the word.

                      4) Ham clubs are a great source of real, up to date information on the latest gizmos and home built ham equipment and antennas. A few feet of 1/2 inch copper tubing or a few welding rods can quadruple (or more!) the range of most hand held 2 meter/ 70 cm radios. Having many electrical engineers and military comm specialists at your fingertips to ask for advice and hands on support is awesome.

                      It took me less than a year (part time) to advance from knowing next to nothing about ham radio to progress from Technician to Extra rating. No one should fear the certification process as the question banks are multiple choice and published well in advance.

                      Good luck and see you on the airwaves.
                      Herk
                      KC3FFW
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