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  • Look this one up: FIRESTIK IBA5 5' (152cm) indoor CB base Antenna.

    Your Cobra 19 Ultra has the same amount of output power as a CB base station.

    Any radio will need an antenna. The key is what antenna can you put up.

    I used to chat with a Ham in Alaska. His antenna was a half wave dipole up in 2 trees. He wasn't using much more output power than a CB has.





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    • I have a couple Cobra 148 radios that work well. A dipole antenna can be made into an old type setup called a "trick stick" Basically you can take two sticks of EMT conduit from your local hardware store and cut them to 108 inches. Mount them to an insulated material putting the coax inner conductor to the top stick and the shield to the bottom. FWIW used to talk long ways with a pair of these setup in phased array. Lots of good antenna info these days on the internet. CB is not dead just sort of in hibernation.

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      • How hard is to RRB ? Radio Re Broadcast., recieves on 1 channel xmits it on another?

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        • Originally posted by Armyjimbo View Post
          How hard is to RRB ? Radio Re Broadcast., recieves on 1 channel xmits it on another?
          Ham radios can listen on one frequency and transmit on another.

          Esar145
          As we are entering a new solar cycle. Let's hope it is a good one. So, hopefully hibernation will be over.

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          • Originally posted by Tugaloo View Post

            Ham radios can listen on one frequency and transmit on another.

            Esar145
            As we are entering a new solar cycle. Let's hope it is a good one. So, hopefully hibernation will be over.
            I've never ventured into that area of radios. I use the UV5Rs and my little shortwave radio, used CBs as a feral child, went to a few jamborees in my day too! I've got to up my game, Ham radios require licenses don't they?

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            • Originally posted by Armyjimbo View Post

              I've never ventured into that area of radios. I use the UV5Rs and my little shortwave radio, used CBs as a feral child, went to a few jamborees in my day too! I've got to up my game, Ham radios require licenses don't they?

              Yes, Ham Radio requires a license; however in the US, Morse code is no longer required. The test is multiple choice and the answers to the questions are available from the ARRL or at Amazon.

              Many shortwave radios can receive signals from WWV:
              https://www.nist.gov/pml/time-and-fr...io-station-wwv
              It broadcasts on 5 MHz, 10 MHz, and 15 MHz; and 2500 W on 2.5 MHz and 20 MHz the exact time by the minute. Of interest to Hams and others, it also broadcasts "geophysical alerts," that include solar activity, sunspots and solar storms. Geophysical alerts provide information about the current conditions for long distance HF radio communications. To answer a survivalist's question, it would also predict solar storms that affect communications; "Solar storms occur when the sun emits huge bursts of energy in the form of solar flares and coronal mass ejections."
              https://www.thesun.co.uk/tech/155863...s-solar-storm/

              One example of a survivalist's interest was the Carrington Event when the sun generates its version of an EMP.
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carrington_Event

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              • Originally posted by Armyjimbo View Post
                How hard is to RRB ? Radio Re Broadcast., recieves on 1 channel xmits it on another?
                Normal repeater systems are not easy, simply because of the size of the antenna's involved.
                Two horizontal dipoles, 100 feet apart, with two radios, connected by phone line, might work.
                You need to mount them so the wires of the two dipoles are end to end, with 100 feet of space between them.
                To test the set up, you need to key one radio, and the other remain silent (can't hear the first radio).

                One way around that is called a simplex repeater, which waits until one party finishes transmitting, and a second or two later, repeats everything it heard, on the same channel.

                Person 1 says: "Hello Jim" on channel 2
                Repeater hears: "Hello Jim" on channel 2
                When Person 1 unkeys (receiver goes silent),
                the repeater says "Hello Jim" on channel 2
                Person two hears the repeater say "Hello Jim" on channel 2.

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                • l've used it lots in the various army cars but as a home base no. thanks

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                  • My Ham rigs can transmit on one frequency and receive on another. There's an A/B switch on them. Communications could prove to be a must in a WROL.
                    One can transmit or receive from 0.030–74.800 MHz or from AM car radio to VHF. Output power on SSB/CW/FM: 2–100W, AM: 1–25W.

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