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What CB Antenna should I get?

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  • coxmw
    replied
    Originally posted by Legionnaire View Post
    Hello everyone been gone a while hope you didn't miss me much. I just earned a CB Radio gratis and decided wth it'll be fun, if not useful in emergencies, to set it up in my truck and maybe make a base station in the home later. The probelm is, there are too damn many antennas out there and I don't really know much about them. I don't have a clearance problem around here so I want to get as long of an antenna as I can, but which one? Wilson 5000? K40Plus? Firestik 7' or Firestik II 5'? This is where I come when I need the serious questions answered!
    On my truck I have a Wilson 5000 at home a skylab and a set of
    moon raker 4's.

    Mike

    Leave a comment:


  • Big_Saw
    replied
    Originally posted by snal View Post
    Sumpin' weird's going on!
    I got my stainless mast up today, didn't attach the "T" piece to the top because I realized that I didn't fab up a sleeve to attach it with, so I simply mounted my Firestick to the top of it.
    I then drove a copper tube 5' into the ground at the base of the mast and grounded everything to it. Went inside and turned the radio on with the coax hooked up directly to the radio, which has a built-in SWR meter. Set the SWR calibration, then flipped the switch to check the SWR.....got the same high reading that I had before!
    Then I unhooked the coax from the radio and connected it to my DOSY test unit, and jumped from it to the radio...the DOSY also showed the same high SWR reading, but now the radio's meter shows an SWR of 1.3!
    What tha heck is going on?
    Man, you got me there.....sounds ike maybe you have a faulty coax? You might try swapping it first (cheapest troubleshoot) and see what you get....make sure you have no kinks and no coiling/overlapping of your coax, too....keep your cable as straight as you can, and as short, too...also look for anything near your coaxial that might be buzzing your signal, like a breaker panel, microwave, etc...even running on a circuit that comes into proximity of your coax....

    Leave a comment:


  • snal
    replied
    Sumpin' weird's going on!
    I got my stainless mast up today, didn't attach the "T" piece to the top because I realized that I didn't fab up a sleeve to attach it with, so I simply mounted my Firestick to the top of it.
    I then drove a copper tube 5' into the ground at the base of the mast and grounded everything to it. Went inside and turned the radio on with the coax hooked up directly to the radio, which has a built-in SWR meter. Set the SWR calibration, then flipped the switch to check the SWR.....got the same high reading that I had before!
    Then I unhooked the coax from the radio and connected it to my DOSY test unit, and jumped from it to the radio...the DOSY also showed the same high SWR reading, but now the radio's meter shows an SWR of 1.3!
    What tha heck is going on?

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicious Ignernt
    replied
    Originally posted by Zombie Axe View Post
    You are ignernt
    Awwww man, you're gonna make me blush.:p

    Leave a comment:


  • Legionnaire
    replied
    It looks like I'm safe for whichever antenna I asked about then. On the salt, you would have to saturated the ground so heavily that it is really impractical to use to improve signal. I read that during my research of antennas, if I find the link I'll put it here for all. Thanks for the info, I'm off to pick whichever of those antennas enhances my sex appeal now, since functionally they sound similar.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zombie Axe
    replied
    Originally posted by Vicious Ignernt View Post
    ZA, ...are you sayin' what I wrote was correct? Are you implyin' that I'm not ignernt?

    Now you listen here, young man, I have worked very hard to establish my reputation as to being the most ignernt member of this forum. I would appreciate your being more respectful of my ignernce.
    You are ignernt, but even our ignernt folks are way smarter than the average sheeple :) You are like ALbert Einstein compared to a sheeple... So congrats;)

    Leave a comment:


  • Big_Saw
    replied
    Originally posted by Vicious Ignernt View Post
    Snal, Thank you, Sir!
    'Bout time somebody backed me up here from these vicious ignernt attacks.
    LMFAO....read up on the salt-solution, and it seems very useful in low-mineral soil, coarse soil, or sand....I've never heard of it, I guess because it never aplllied to my locale, but good info, none-the-less....:D....especially enjoyed learning the science of it...

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicious Ignernt
    replied
    Originally posted by snal View Post
    Not to worry VI...I'm informing as many as I can about the real truth.
    Snal, Thank you, Sir!
    'Bout time somebody backed me up here from these vicious ignernt attacks.

    Leave a comment:


  • snal
    replied
    Originally posted by Vicious Ignernt View Post
    ZA, ...are you sayin' what I wrote was correct? Are you implyin' that I'm not ignernt?

    Now you listen here, young man, I have worked very hard to establish my reputation as to being the most ignernt member of this forum. I would appreciate your being more respectful of my ignernce.
    Not to worry VI...I'm informing as many as I can about the real truth. Heck, my whole family knows about how you use snakes for job security, training them to blow high voltage fuses and such.
    Wait a minute...that works...so maybe it ain't ignernt!

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicious Ignernt
    replied
    Originally posted by Zombie Axe View Post
    As for salt to improve ground, as VI said coastal regions/sandhills have a problem with this, so it is something that is done. Many hams on the coast do this.
    ZA, ...are you sayin' what I wrote was correct? Are you implyin' that I'm not ignernt?

    Now you listen here, young man, I have worked very hard to establish my reputation as to being the most ignernt member of this forum. I would appreciate your being more respectful of my ignernce.

    Leave a comment:


  • Zombie Axe
    replied
    Big Saw has a very good handle on the CB installs, so I have nothing to add.

    As for salt to improve ground, as VI said coastal regions/sandhills have a problem with this, so it is something that is done. Many hams on the coast do this.

    Leave a comment:


  • snal
    replied
    Originally posted by Vicious Ignernt View Post
    WOW!:eek: I am impressed! I have no words to express my awe and respect.

    Saw, have you ever heard of adding salt to the ground plane?
    I just recently read about that somewhere online.

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicious Ignernt
    replied
    [QUOTE=Big_Saw;13944]Can't say that I have....what's the purpose?QUOTE]

    Back about 20 years or so, I worked in commercial radio broadcasting. It was common for an engineer or tech's name to get passed around if a company was hiring. So one guy called me at the station I worked at. I went for an interview and he told me about his line of work. Do you remember, back in the day, along the interstates, you'd see a sign that said "For traffic info, tune radio to 560 am" or some such frequency? Well, this guy had a company that contracted out the installs of those public info systems. It was real low power AM. And when installing the tower and tranny, the guy would cut costs as much as possible. So instead of an elaborate ground plane, with multiple ground rods and multiple runs of copper radials, someone had come up with putting some salt in with the ground rods. If I remember right, it was using road salt, CaCl, not table salt, NaCl. I think this reduced copper corrosion. Now I'm not a scientist, so don't quote me on this, but I think the salt did 2 things, it absorbed water from surrounding dirt and it provided charged ions for somesuch affect for the ground plane. As the salt leached into the soil it would improve the "ion flow" of the copper ground plane to earth ground and increase the size of the footprint of the arth ground. It was used especially for installs down east in NC, where the soil is sandy and not so ground friendly. I've never used this technique myself. But your post was so thorough, I thought for sure you would have heard of it. Short story made long, it helps the ground plane conduct with the earth ground.

    But, then again, I'm ignernt.

    Leave a comment:


  • Big_Saw
    replied
    Originally posted by Vicious Ignernt View Post
    WOW!:eek: I am impressed! I have no words to express my awe and respect.

    Saw, have you ever heard of adding salt to the ground plane?
    Can't say that I have....what's the purpose?

    I may not have ZAs expertise with all things commo, but I consider myself well-versed in the CB realm.....

    Leave a comment:


  • Vicious Ignernt
    replied
    Originally posted by Big_Saw View Post
    Poor ground will affect everything about how your antenna interacts with your radio....if you use the old pound-the-ground-down approach, I'd recommend a copper pipe, as far as you can drive it....pre drive your hole with a rock bar or something of the like, and a ittle smaller than your pipe (copper's too soft to go pounding on it)......sand the copper pipe with some good grit, and drill a hole through the exposed portion....smear on more conductive grease...... wrap a few winds of wire around the pipe, just below the hole, feed through the hole and bolt your wire to it...then coat the whole exposed portion with silicone sealant, and wet the ground around your pipe every day for a good week and tamp it to get the soil around it real tight with the new ground-pole....viola!
    WOW!:eek: I am impressed! I have no words to express my awe and respect.

    Saw, have you ever heard of adding salt to the ground plane?

    Leave a comment:

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