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    TheUnboundOne
    Senior Member

  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Das, I imagine that the canister of an air horn would have a warning about heat and pressure. If not, keep it either in your lunch cooler or in another cooler place in the vehicle. Failing this option, whistles are good and compact and have no pressure canister.

    Leave a comment:

  • nitehawg
    Valued Member

  • nitehawg
    replied
    Texting

    Has anybody else noticed that texting on a cell phone seems to get through in emergencies when voice can't?

    Leave a comment:

  • das
    Senior Member

  • das
    replied
    Air horn was a great idea. Anyone know if they hold up in a Texas heated trunk that I can only imagine gets into some rather high temperatures. I'm okay leaving ammunition in the trunk but it is not under pressure.

    Heat + pressure = expansion....not good.

    Leave a comment:

  • nitehawg
    Valued Member

  • nitehawg
    replied
    Hey everybody,

    Comms in an emergency is of utmost importance. Ham is probably the best in long term long distance situations. I'm currently studying to get my "ticket" and look forward to adding Ham to my goodies. CB is often overlooked and/or laughed at (hangover form the '60's& 70's good buddy). I personally have several mobile units to include a hand held. The hand held is my personal current favorite as it offers an external antenna and cigar plug power when mobile, and an extendable internal antenna and battery power when dismounted. FRS/GMRS are OK for neighborhood, very local comms. Handy in everyday use between me and spouse when shopping, working around house, etc. There is a movement to establish FRS ch 1 as an emergency ch nation wide (check out www.nationalsos.com). And please don't forget that the quality of the antenna, coax and proper grounding are at least twice as important as the transceiver itself.

    On the low tech side, I keep a whistle with me at all times and each of my vehicles has an "air horn" in it's kit. Ain't nobody gonna look for ya if they don't know your there.

    Enjoy and STAY SAFE

    Leave a comment:

  • TheUnboundOne
    Senior Member

  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Comm

    Dear das,

    Greetings! I'm glad you're impressed, but it really 'twern't nothin'.

    :o

    I just remembered what I have read in the pages of Cybertek and Iron Feather Journal

    (Note: For Information and Academic Study Purposes Only): A signal amplifier and antenna connected to the video output of a video camera, a VCR, or a DVD player can be used to send TV images up to around 5 miles. Naturally, the camera, VCR, or DVD player would have to be operating on the same channel and the antenna would have to be high up, but it could serve as an alternative communications system if TSHTF.

    Other low-tech possibilities for lake dwellers or plains dwellers are semaphore flags and ship signal flags with different flags for each letter of the alphabet, or flare guns for signalling.

    Leave a comment:

  • das
    Senior Member

  • das
    replied
    Awesome knowledge TUO, color me impressed. I have given long and hard thought to buying a pair of quad band Icom radio's but have never followed through mainly as I can't find the $1k required, lol. I understand that ICOM makes the best but it may be more than simple preppers need.

    Leave a comment:

  • TheUnboundOne
    Senior Member

  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Comm

    Dear Diesel and Forum Members,

    In addition to my cellular phone, I have a 40-channel CB walkie talkie that I have used and I know it will broadcast from Lowell, NC to the Carolina's Medical Center in Charlotte, NC, around 20 miles.

    I know some basic ground signals to make out of rocks, branches, or other objects visible from the air.

    I also have signal mirrors and books and cards with the Morse Code written on them, though I really need to memorize Morse Code by heart.

    My own experience with the FRS end of FRS/GMRS isn't so good. I bought a set of FRS/GMRS walkie-talkies and the FRS frequency couldn't broadcast through walls or even over hills and in wooded areas, even though the package said it could broadcast up to 15 miles. Basically, if you don't have a clear line of sight between the walkie-talkies, you're toast if you rely on these things.

    Perhaps GMRS is better, but using GMRS does require you to say "Big Brother May I?" to the FCC and get a license.

    I have an electronics kit capable of making a miniature FM transmitter that can go a few feet and I subscribe to Nuts and Volts Magazine, so I know of sources for micropower transmitters and signal amplifiers that can help transmit longer distances.

    As far as receivers, I know how to rig a Sony Walkman to pick up Shortwave and I know how to make a crystal radio that requires no power whatsoever and uses commonly-available items.

    I have no experience with Ham Radio, but my Uncle has a license and gets on from time to time.

    That's the extent of my Communication skills. I wish I could spend even more time with it because it is a fun hobby, as well as useful WTSHTF.

    Leave a comment:

  • Diesel
    Administrator

  • Diesel
    replied
    Ditto, i should too...

    and yo uknow we say that and say it, and say it and then all of the sudden it's too late :/ we don't know it when we need to

    Leave a comment:

  • Aftermath
    Junior Member

  • Aftermath
    started a topic Comm

    Comm

    So curious what you guys have lined for comm

    The obvious stuff is nice to have for the interim begining of shtf

    like GRMS/FRS
    UHF
    VHF

    everyone should have all of those bands.. do you?

    But who here knows HAM or has the equipment.. ham with a hand generator would be a great solution, it's something i am looking into
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