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  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by NRAamy View Post
    We'll have to plan a meetup. :)
    That will work. I think you'll like that area. Mountains, streams, rivers and good people.

    Dale

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  • NRAamy
    replied
    We'll have to plan a meetup. :)

    Leave a comment:


  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by NRAamy View Post
    Dale, my employer ( I work/live on a ranch ) has a daughter in Kentucky, and he wants to live closer to her. He has bid on a place there, very rural, up against a forest, creek running through it. The offer was accepted. Just waiting for the appraisal to go through. So, we would be moving there early January when escrow closes. I plan on homesteading there (vegetable garden, green house, raise chickens, etc) but I know very little about that area. Just that it's green, and Southern Idaho is not. ;)
    You will love eastern KY. The wife told me about your move before I got here. You will only be 2 to 3 hours away from me then. You'll still be in elk country. Just eastern elk. Vegetables grow easier here too. Plenty of water.

    Dale

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  • NRAamy
    replied
    And yes, it's in Eastern Kentucky. Would only be a 10 hour drive to my parents in Upstate NY.

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  • NRAamy
    replied
    Dale, my employer ( I work/live on a ranch ) has a daughter in Kentucky, and he wants to live closer to her. He has bid on a place there, very rural, up against a forest, creek running through it. The offer was accepted. Just waiting for the appraisal to go through. So, we would be moving there early January when escrow closes. I plan on homesteading there (vegetable garden, green house, raise chickens, etc) but I know very little about that area. Just that it's green, and Southern Idaho is not. ;)

    Leave a comment:


  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by NRAamy View Post
    Dale..... Do you think that book would be helpful in Rural Kentucky as well?
    Very much so, especially in eastern Kentucky. You leaving Idaho already? KY is just next door to me.

    Dale

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  • NRAamy
    replied
    Dale..... Do you think that book would be helpful in Rural Kentucky as well?

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  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Buggyout View Post

    Thanks man! Books on the way. I'm trying to glean as much information as I can. I don't agree with all the principals with some of these guys, it's a "Eat the whole chicken, spit out the bones" thing. Most definitely.

    This guy seems to have his ducks in order though!

    -Buggy
    Let me know what you think of the book. I really like it, but the wildlife biologist in me might over ride other views.

    Dale

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  • Buggyout
    replied
    Originally posted by dalewick View Post
    I am very partial Sepp Holzer's Permaculture methods and have his book. It works well here in the mountains of WV as it does for him in Germany. Buggy, his roundwood shelters could work really well for you in the pacific NW. Especially if you plan on raising animals or simply need some hidden cellar type structures.

    Dale
    Thanks man! Books on the way. I'm trying to glean as much information as I can. I don't agree with all the principals with some of these guys, it's a "Eat the whole chicken, spit out the bones" thing. Most definitely.

    This guy seems to have his ducks in order though!

    -Buggy

    Leave a comment:


  • dalewick
    replied
    I am very partial Sepp Holzer's Permaculture methods and have his book. It works well here in the mountains of WV as it does for him in Germany. Buggy, his roundwood shelters could work really well for you in the pacific NW. Especially if you plan on raising animals or simply need some hidden cellar type structures.

    Dale

    Leave a comment:


  • Buggyout
    replied
    Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
    Highly recommend checking out Geoff Lawton. Search Youtube for some of his things Like Greening the Desert. Geoff was Bill Molison's student, understudy and heir-apparent. Bill was the coauthor with Holgram and honestly probably the better known and more relatable of the 2. Sadly he just passed a year or 2 ago.

    Geoff has a permaculture farm in Australia, I think it's called Zatuna Farm? He also has another project going in Jordon and also travels the world on projects and speaking engagements. His original Greening the Desert was in Jordon's salt loaded soil of the Dead Sea and he literally made the desert bloom thru the principles of Permaculture and turning it into a food forest.

    Here is a link to his current desert project:
    https://www.greeningthedesertproject.org/

    And here is a link to one of the original projects videos
    https://youtu.be/xgF9BU4uYMU
    I took a look at his place! Yeah, thankfully, water is not an issue here in the rainy Northwest. It's amazing the conservation being done with water!

    I'm no hippy, but.... The whole "green" thing really makes sense SOMEWHAT in the practical.

    -Buggy

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  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Highly recommend checking out Geoff Lawton. Search Youtube for some of his things Like Greening the Desert. Geoff was Bill Molison's student, understudy and heir-apparent. Bill was the coauthor with Holgram and honestly probably the better known and more relatable of the 2. Sadly he just passed a year or 2 ago.

    Geoff has a permaculture farm in Australia, I think it's called Zatuna Farm? He also has another project going in Jordon and also travels the world on projects and speaking engagements. His original Greening the Desert was in Jordon's salt loaded soil of the Dead Sea and he literally made the desert bloom thru the principles of Permaculture and turning it into a food forest.

    Here is a link to his current desert project:
    https://www.greeningthedesertproject.org/

    And here is a link to one of the original projects videos
    https://youtu.be/xgF9BU4uYMU
    Last edited by CountryGuy; 11-19-2020, 08:41 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Buggyout
    started a topic Permaculture

    Permaculture

    Twelve Permaculture design principles articulated by David Holmgren in his Permaculture: Principles and Pathways Beyond Sustainability:[26]
    1. Observe and interact: By taking time to engage with nature we can design solutions that suit our particular situation.
    2. Catch and store energy: By developing systems that collect resources at peak abundance, we can use them in times of need.
    3. Obtain a yield: Ensure that you are getting truly useful rewards as part of the work that you are doing.
    4. Apply self-regulation and accept feedback: We need to discourage inappropriate activity to ensure that systems can continue to function well.
    5. Use and value renewable resources and services: Make the best use of nature's abundance to reduce our consumptive behavior and dependence on non-renewable resources.
    6. Produce no waste: By valuing and making use of all the resources that are available to us, nothing goes to waste.
    7. Design from patterns to details: By stepping back, we can observe patterns in nature and society. These can form the backbone of our designs, with the details filled in as we go.
    8. Integrate rather than segregate: By putting the right things in the right place, relationships develop between those things and they work together to support each other.
    9. Use small and slow solutions: Small and slow systems are easier to maintain than big ones, making better use of local resources and producing more sustainable outcomes.
    10. Use and value diversity: Diversity reduces vulnerability to a variety of threats and takes advantage of the unique nature of the environment in which it resides.
    11. Use edges and value the marginal: The interface between things is where the most interesting events take place. These are often the most valuable, diverse and productive elements in the system.
    12. Creatively use and respond to change: We can have a positive impact on inevitable change by carefully observing, and then intervening at the right time.
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