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Watermelon HELP!

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    dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    [QUOTE=CountryGuy;n211526

    I'm like you Dale, I keep thinking that one of these seasons mother nature will shine on me and I might luck out. .[/QUOTE]

    I'm not stopping trying until I can't garden any more. LOL! Bone headed stubborn I guess.

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  • CountryGuy
    Valued Member

  • CountryGuy
    replied
    I've had 0 success with watermelon up here also, also doing Sugar Babies and tried Gray something or other. Gray died off after a few weeks, the sugar babies vines get big and look healthy, i even try to prune them as suggested to allow less plant and more energy to go into the fruit. But last year I had 3 start to grow, one got eaten out but 2 got to about size of small canon ball. They had a good taste but were about 60% seed with little meat, like they need to grow much longer. This year I planted 2 Sugar baby plants from the nursery over the hill and the vines got nice but I only ended up with one setting 2 fruit. Then, just as they were getting to a nice size and I was thinking about harvesting, something ate into them both and cleaned them out from the inside, clean as a whistle. Not sure but I'm thinking if it was a mouse or a vole.

    I'm like you Dale, I keep thinking that one of these seasons mother nature will shine on me and I might luck out. I'm going to look into the varieties Cedar mentioned. Also I'm thinking I might try planting a large pot on my deck and let it hang down over the rail and see if that helps keep the critters away.
    CountryGuy
    Valued Member
    Last edited by CountryGuy; 11-10-2017, 02:12 PM.

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  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Cedar View Post
    Shouldn't be at ground level. Although I know some places can get nasty winds. Where there is a will, and an obsession for gardening, there is a way. Set old sliding glass doors as a wall on the wind side of the garden. I have had good luck with those five gallon clear water jugs with the bottoms jigsawed off and pushed a couple inches into the soil. The winds tend to push around them.

    I think even the stouter wire tomato cages would work if pushed 5-6" deep.

    Cedar
    I make my cages out of cattle panels (things have a ton of uses) as I can stake them down tight and not have my plants broken off. My cages actually push in about 16 inches deep. regular tomato cages actually blow over up here when plants get mature (very irritating) as I hate losing my tomato's or pepper plants. I quit trying to grow corn here years ago. It got wind sheared every year. But, I'm figuring out melons. LOL!.

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  • Cedar
    Valued Member

  • Cedar
    replied
    You might also look into short season varieties like "Blacktail Mountain", and a couple from the Crimea region. Look at Seed Savers Exchange and see what is in their rotation this year for Russian/Crimea landraced varieties.

    Cedar

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  • Cedar
    Valued Member

  • Cedar
    replied
    Shouldn't be at ground level. Although I know some places can get nasty winds. Where there is a will, and an obsession for gardening, there is a way. Set old sliding glass doors as a wall on the wind side of the garden. I have had good luck with those five gallon clear water jugs with the bottoms jigsawed off and pushed a couple inches into the soil. The winds tend to push around them.

    I think even the stouter wire tomato cages would work if pushed 5-6" deep.

    Cedar

    Leave a comment:

  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Cedar View Post
    Plant them in location, but cloque them. Milk jugs? Tomato cages with clear plastic bags over them...
    Cedar
    The wind in my location is NOT good for leaving anything "light weight", less than a truck outside in the springtime. Routinely get 45 to 55 mph winds in spring and winter. I live on top of a Mountain at 2600 feet in elevation. Thanks for the thought.

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  • Cedar
    Valued Member

  • Cedar
    replied
    Originally posted by dalewick View Post

    I'm growing sugar babies. Would change if I could find something that matures faster. I think I'm starting the plants indoors this year. Building a new greenhouse in 2 years and going back to Aquaponics.
    Plant them in location, but cloque them. Milk jugs? Tomato cages with clear plastic bags over them...
    Cedar

    Leave a comment:

  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Cedar View Post
    What variety are you growing? You might be better off with a short season melon like I have to grow, types like "Blacktail Mountain", "Sugar Baby" or "Cream Of Saskatchewan". The "Moon & Stars (van Doreen strain) might help you out as well, as the "moon' is a good yellow-gold when time. All of those and melons which originated in the Russian and Crimea areas do well in short season, cooler climares, like my own. You probably want to stay away from varieties which take longer, like the "Charleston Grey", which take longer to grow out, as they are 30-40# melons. Stick to the smaller varieties, unless you have a large family or an upcoming party.

    Cedar
    I'm growing sugar babies. Would change if I could find something that matures faster. I think I'm starting the plants indoors this year. Building a new greenhouse in 2 years and going back to Aquaponics.

    Leave a comment:

  • Cedar
    Valued Member

  • Cedar
    replied
    What variety are you growing? You might be better off with a short season melon like I have to grow, types like "Blacktail Mountain", "Sugar Baby" or "Cream Of Saskatchewan". The "Moon & Stars (van Doreen strain) might help you out as well, as the "moon' is a good yellow-gold when time. All of those and melons which originated in the Russian and Crimea areas do well in short season, cooler climares, like my own. You probably want to stay away from varieties which take longer, like the "Charleston Grey", which take longer to grow out, as they are 30-40# melons. Stick to the smaller varieties, unless you have a large family or an upcoming party.

    Cedar
    Cedar
    Valued Member
    Last edited by Cedar; 10-27-2017, 07:31 PM.

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  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by rabunmom View Post
    You can watch the curly cue on the end when it is dried the melon should be ready to pick. Look at the under side of melon if it pale color and look a bit scratched up then it is read to eat. Hi Dale
    Thanks mom, I'll try that!

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  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by Applejack View Post
    Never grew watermelon. Don't have enough garden space. Wish I could be of some help.
    Glad you are back. We missed you.
    AJ, Good to be back. Thanks!

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  • dalewick
    Valued Member

  • dalewick
    replied
    Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
    Dale are you living in the southern states? Because here in Florida watermelon is known as a cash crop. You can get it to grow almost any where.
    Rich, I'm in the heart of West Virginia at about 2500 ft elevation. Spring usually comes late and fall comes early. Doesn't stop me from trying. Almost time to build that new greenhouse.

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  • RICHFL
    Valued Member

  • RICHFL
    replied
    Dale are you living in the southern states? Because here in Florida watermelon is known as a cash crop. You can get it to grow almost any where.

    Leave a comment:

  • Applejack
    Valued Member

  • Applejack
    replied
    Never grew watermelon. Don't have enough garden space. Wish I could be of some help.
    Glad you are back. We missed you.

    Leave a comment:

  • rabunmom
    Valued Member

  • rabunmom
    replied
    You can watch the curly cue on the end when it is dried the melon should be ready to pick. Look at the under side of melon if it pale color and look a bit scratched up then it is read to eat. Hi Dale

    Leave a comment:

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