Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What is the best ways to make a container for a cache?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Z - If I may, you want to use a female end with internal threads and a clean out plug. You could put a little teflon tape on the threads if you like. If you use something like silicon it will work but will effectively cement the threads and make it very very difficult to remove the plug. even with tape you will likely need a tool to help remove the plug. One thing I do before burying them is to put a gallon ziploc draped over the end or wrap the end with shrink wrap, just to help keep it cleaner when you need to open it up.
    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
      Z - If I may, you want to use a female end with internal threads and a clean out plug. You could put a little teflon tape on the threads if you like. If you use something like silicon it will work but will effectively cement the threads and make it very very difficult to remove the plug. even with tape you will likely need a tool to help remove the plug. One thing I do before burying them is to put a gallon ziploc draped over the end or wrap the end with shrink wrap, just to help keep it cleaner when you need to open it up.
      Seems logical to prevent debris or sand or what ever out of the threads. However if pressed for time and/or necessity, could you not simply mark one end "break here" after ensuring the tube was long enough to shift things to the other end before you use a rock or what ever to break the tube?

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by ZAGran View Post

        Seems logical to prevent debris or sand or what ever out of the threads. However if pressed for time and/or necessity, could you not simply mark one end "break here" after ensuring the tube was long enough to shift things to the other end before you use a rock or what ever to break the tube?
        Gran, if you are going to hit on PVC or ABS pipe to break it open, be careful. The stuff is very tough and I've seen people hit in the face with there own hammers from smacking pipes. It may be more efficient to make your tubes re-sealable in case you don't need everything in them at one time. You can also use petroleum jelly to seal the threaded end and it tends to not seize up the threads as bad. KY Jelly also works (Please don't ask). I've also seen axel grease used, but I never like it except when used on empty 155mm Howitzer canisters.

        Dale
        Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by dalewick View Post

          Gran, if you are going to hit on PVC or ABS pipe to break it open, be careful. The stuff is very tough and I've seen people hit in the face with there own hammers from smacking pipes. It may be more efficient to make your tubes re-sealable in case you don't need everything in them at one time. You can also use petroleum jelly to seal the threaded end and it tends to not seize up the threads as bad. KY Jelly also works (Please don't ask). I've also seen axel grease used, but I never like it except when used on empty 155mm Howitzer canisters.

          Dale
          The more you ask the more you learn. Thanks for the heads up on breaking PVC. I have broken PVC BUT it had been exposed to the sun and weather for years so it was old and had degraded some. Buried it would last much longer. No sun, less temperature changes and so on. PVC sewage pipes seem to last forever buried. DUH on my part.

          Comment


          • #20
            Yeah, like Dale said, you'd be hard pressed to break it, now if you had the time and access to a hacksaw or handsaw you could cut off glued on endcaps.
            I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

            Comment


            • #21
              I used an internally threaded end with a plug. I sealed the threads with pipe tape. I also painted the exterior with 3M undercoating.

              In place of oxygen absorbers, I used a hand warmer. I opened a package and placed it inside. It should have used up any available oxygen and then gone dormant. But I didn't know of a way to test that.

              My next test is to store the cache in a roof environment. This will expose it to high heat in the summer and freezing temps in the winter but little if any moisture all year. It's not a good hiding place, but it provides the extreme temps I was looking for to test it.

              I suspect the high heat will degrade the plastics causing them to off-gas. This off-gassing may affect the shelf life of the materials stored inside.
              If it was man made it can be man re-made.

              Comment


              • #22
                Let us know how the test turn out. I for one would be interested. I realize many houses do not have a crawl space but if you do wonder if that would be a good place to try this type of storage. Of course your crawl space should be relatively dry. If you have standing water under your house and should not have you have more problems than a place to store stuff.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by Mangler View Post
                  I used an internally threaded end with a plug. I sealed the threads with pipe tape. I also painted the exterior with 3M undercoating.

                  In place of oxygen absorbers, I used a hand warmer. I opened a package and placed it inside. It should have used up any available oxygen and then gone dormant. But I didn't know of a way to test that.

                  My next test is to store the cache in a roof environment. This will expose it to high heat in the summer and freezing temps in the winter but little if any moisture all year. It's not a good hiding place, but it provides the extreme temps I was looking for to test it.

                  I suspect the high heat will degrade the plastics causing them to off-gas. This off-gassing may affect the shelf life of the materials stored inside.
                  Mangler, Just an FYI on the chemical hand warmers. Save the used ones. They are half of the needed ingredients for making thermite. With it and aluminum powder and a igniter you can thermite weld or cut.

                  Just one question also. What is your thought on adding the 3M undercoating.

                  Dale
                  Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    I'm suspecting the undercoat is trying to add a layer of protection? One thing you can do to help preserve PVC pipe outside, say in an above ground irrigation system is to wipe it clean with a cleaner like mineral spirits or acetone. then take some white latex paint and cut 50/50 with water and then wipe it on with like a rag or cheap sponge. This will act to help delay UV degradation of the PVC. you can do anycolor if your trying to hide or blend it in but white will help to reflect most UV..
                    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by dalewick View Post

                      Just one question also. What is your thought on adding the 3M undercoating.

                      Dale
                      It was merely cosmetic and the only "paint" I had at the time. I was thinking a flat black container would be more concealable than a four foot long bright white object.
                      If it was man made it can be man re-made.

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Mangler View Post

                        It was merely cosmetic and the only "paint" I had at the time. I was thinking a flat black container would be more concealable than a four foot long bright white object.
                        Got it.

                        Just a thought for anyone caching supplies in a SHTF scenario. Anywhere there is heavy vegetation a cache can be hung high up in the tree tops to hide it with paracord, so it can be retrieved quickly. Works well in jungle, summer swamps and woods as well as in conifer forest. For a good watertight cache container it is good to hide cache's under water. It takes a good deal of weight attached to most tubes to hold them under but anyone searching for your cache will seldom bother with searching under water. This can be extremely effective along coastal areas and swamps. Care should be taken with rivers and streams as high water events can dislodge your cache and it could be lost to you. For high value caches, the new GPS locators can be used very effectively. Some advanced caching methods can be used with them allowing caches to be hidden in ways that they are constantly moving, such as in a raft hide, attached to free ranging animals or caches that are parachute delivered.
                        Judge no one, until you have walked in the same mud and spilt the same blood. Him, I call brother.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I'll talk about semi buried 40 foot cargo containers. My family group built unto a hill side enough space to put 5 containers side by side. We first dug out the hill side, Built up a 6" re-enforced concrete pad, and built concrete block walls to hold the dirt back. Now we put the pad at a 3 degree sloop away from the hill side to drain water. We also put drain tubing around the walls to ensure proper drainage. This took 5 years to do. Every summer we expanded it.

                          Next year we plan on roofing over the containers to stop any rust. We did paint a rubber coating when each container was placed

                          It took a lot of money and time and effort to do this but now we have enough food storage for our group to live comfortable for up to 5 years.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by RICHFL View Post
                            I'll talk about semi buried 40 foot cargo containers. My family group built unto a hill side enough space to put 5 containers side by side. We first dug out the hill side, Built up a 6" re-enforced concrete pad, and built concrete block walls to hold the dirt back. Now we put the pad at a 3 degree sloop away from the hill side to drain water. We also put drain tubing around the walls to ensure proper drainage. This took 5 years to do. Every summer we expanded it.

                            Next year we plan on roofing over the containers to stop any rust. We did paint a rubber coating when each container was placed

                            It took a lot of money and time and effort to do this but now we have enough food storage for our group to live comfortable for up to 5 years.
                            Did you coat the concrete block with something to prevent moisture from seeping through as well?

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Z - here is an idea too for smaller caches, military motor tubes. they thread on and have a rubber o-ring gasket. as others said you could put a glob of vaseline on the threads before screwing on the cap and it'd both help add to the seal and lube the threads to get it off easier at a later date.
                              I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                ZAGran - - Yes we used a coating that is mostly rubber and tar. They use it up here for all the basements walls,

                                Hint: Don't try to move a container by yourself! Only the container corners are re-enforced! Several companies will add angle iron to re-enforce sides and top. Don't use wood!!!!!!!

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X