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"The Road" by Cormac McCarthy...

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  • "The Road" by Cormac McCarthy...

    http://www.amazon.com/Road-Movie-Tie...1894661&sr=8-1

    Picked this book up today at the book store. It's name keeps popping up all over my S&P themed email groups. Looks to be a good read... seems like a movie is coming out too...

    here is a review from Amazon:

    "The Road" is a work of stunning, savage, heartbreaking beauty. Set in the post-apocalyptic hell of an unending nuclear winter, Cormac McCarthy writes about a nameless man and his young son, wandering through a world gone crazy; bleak, cold, dark, where the snow falls down gray; moving south toward the coast, looking somewhere, anywhere, for life and warmth. Nothing grows in this blasted world; people turn into cannibals to survive. We don't know if we're looking at the aftermath of a nuclear war, or maybe an extinction level event -- an asteroid or a comet; McCarthy deliberately doesn't tell us, and we come to realize it doesn't matter anyway. Whether man or nature threw a wild pitch, the world is just as dead.

    The boy's mother is a suicide, unable to face living in a world where everything's gone gray and dead. Keep on living and you'll end up raped and murdered along with everybody else, she tells the man before she eats a bullet. The man and his son are "each the other's world entire"; they have only each other, they live for each other, and their intense love for each other will help them survive. At least for a while.

    But survival in this brave new world is a dicey prospect at best; the boy and the man are subjected to sights no one should ever have to see. Every day is a scavenger hunt for food and shelter and safety from the "bad guys", the marauding gangs who enslave the weak and resort to cannibalism for lack of any other food. We are the good guys, the man assures his son. Yet in their rare encounters with other living human beings, the man resorts to primitive survivalism, refusing help to a lost child and a starving man, living only for himself and his son, who is trying to hold onto whatever humanity he has left. It's in these chance encounters with other people, even more than their interaction with each other, that we see them for who they really are. The boy is a radiantly sweet child, caring, unselfish, wanting and needing to reach out to others, even though this bleak, blasted world is the only environment he's ever known; the father, more cautious, more bitter, has let the devastation enwrap him until all he cares about is himself and his son. And to hell with everybody else.

    Their journey to the coast is an unending nightmare through the depths of hell and the only thing that holds them together is their love for each other. When one is ready to give up, the other refuses to let him. I won't let you go into the darkness alone, the man reassures his son. But ultimately, as the boy finds out, everyone is on his own, and all you can do is keep on keeping on.

    McCarthy has proven himself a master of minimalism; with a style as bleak as the stripped terrain the man and the boy travel through, but each sentence polished as a gem, he takes us into the harsh reality of a dying world. The past is gone, dead as the landscape all around them, and the present is the only reality. There is no later, McCarthy says. This is later. Deep down the man knows there is nothing better to hope for down the road, even though he keeps them both slogging down it, only to keep his son alive. And we keep slogging down that road with them, hoping against hope that around the next corner or five miles down the line, maybe there is something, anything, to make survival worth while.

    Living in such a hell, why would anyone want to survive? The mother made her decision; she checked out long ago. We come to the end of this book totally drained, enervated, devastated, but curiously uplifted. Because as long as there is love, McCarthy tells us, maybe there is something to live for, and as the book shows us at the end, maybe there is a even little bit of hope.
    73

    later,
    ZA

    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to
    beat you to death with it because it is empty.

    The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.


  • #2
    This is a great literary work of fiction. I see it as an allegory describing all of mankind's various and sundry brutalities and the course that good men must take to battle aginst what often seems an unwinnable tide of evile.
    The road to serfdom is paved with free electric golf carts.

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow.. what a great read :eek: One of the best written books I have read in a long time:eek: I read it in 3 nights...

      It is a book about a father and a son as they bug out from wherever to the coast... Not much left and everything has pretty much been looted already... VERY VERY bleak, but an amazing story :cool:

      ZA says check out this book... and he also says... don't put yourself in a situation like this!!!

      The book focuses on the road they are taking to get where they are going... Roads should be avoided... but it made pushing the shopping cart easier...
      73

      later,
      ZA

      Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to
      beat you to death with it because it is empty.

      The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.

      Comment


      • #4
        OK boys and girls, here ya go......the FREE online book of "The Road".

        http://www.scribd.com/doc/6851136/MCCARTHY-The-Road

        You may have to join (for free or you may not have to join, can't remember, been so long that I did). You never hear from them..
        http://www.scribd.com - Go to this site and type in any book, it is amazing how many books you can get for free. Survival,militray books and manuels, blah, blah, blah.....you get the picture. You can also download the books if you want, cool huh?
        Hope ya like it.

        Comment


        • #5
          alas , babylon is also good.

          Comment


          • #6
            Zombie Axe and Ragnar Redbeard,

            Much obliged for the recommendation and the link (respectively, to each of you.) I'll see if I can get to it in between my reading of how-to and repair books. If nothing else, it will be in my backlog of books to read.

            I saw a BIG list of apocalyptic and post-apocalyptic literature on SurvivalistBoards.com one time. I thought: "How ironic...You could read this list from now until the end of the world."

            :D

            And, on a more somber note, you could get so much into reading from this list, you wouldn't have time to do what it takes to survive and prepare...or you might lose the will to do so.

            :eek:

            What I need are more audio versions of my backlog of books. Now that would be fantastic!
            "Apocalypse is by no means inevitable." --Jim Rice.

            Comment

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