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  • methusaleh
    replied
    Originally posted by Big_Saw View Post
    But, seriously...really good post. No matter what shape you're in, or how much rest you're missing in life, your training - or lack of it - will have an effect on your survival....and instincts don't just graft themselves into your subconscious....you need to train in every skillset you possess!
    Ah, my mantra as well, however it is quite often that the so-called prepared persons forget this and think that they can just read books and visit websites and master all of the skills they will need.

    That said...

    I have trained with the US Army on scenarios where we were purposefully sleep-deprived and then forced to E&E, run land navigation courses, set up ambushes, forage for food in the wild, etc. Even with training, one loses a lot of mental clarity after so many hours awake. However that training paid off a couple times during my service, when we found ourselves in situations where we had to do things to survive "for real" and we had the confidence we needed due to training.

    One tip about staying awake for guard duty/fire watch...find a nice, sharp rock and kneel on it. Do not sit, lie down, or get too comfortable unless you absolutely must. Kneeling on a sharp rock will make the discomfort keep you from getting cozy and falling asleep. However laying down does have its advantages (not going to stray too far off-topic); since the enemy may be traveling by low-crawling, you may spot human movement much better if your vantage point is the ground itself.

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  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Brosia,

    Here's some more thoughts about sleeplessness and the Survivalist:

    While sleeplessness isn't always totally avoidable, a Survivalist needs to make use of what's on hand to perform necessary survival skills while asleep and minimize unneccessary loss of sleep.

    For example, shelter. A shelter used in the wilderness should be as easy to set up as it is to take down, so if sleep is necessary, all the Survivalist has to do is lay down sufficient ground cover, set up the frame and overhead cover, then get to sleep. Ground cover should be leaves, pine needles, or air mattresses sufficient to keep you about a foot off the ground. Cover overhead should be leak-free and there must be a gap of dead air between you and the elements to avoid hypothermia, which can kill in temperatures as high as 59 Degrees Fahrenheit.

    Keep blindfolds, ear plugs, and/or "white-noise" machines with your BOB if you need them to keep sleep disturbances away. Maybe meditative music or windchimes can help you get to sleep, so bring them along if you like.

    Shelters should also be camouflaged, so that the Survivalist is less likely to be disturbed and awakened by hostile four-legged or two-legged beasts. Fires in a circle at a distance around the shelter can serve to scare off potential predators.

    For food, pelts, and bones, a Survivalist could use trapping by night as well as hunting and fishing. If the area is filled with fauna, a trap-line that you keep up with on a regular basis by day should do just as well as hunting and fishing by night.

    (Legal addendum, check with your local Game Warden for local laws on trapping if you're going to do it on a regular basis. Trapping in a survival situation might fly with a judge and jury, but not chronic trapping out of season or use of cruel, inhumane traps.)

    For security, a Survivalist should use firmly-constructed, well-locked windows and doors, loud, yapping nuissance dogs as well as big, snarling guard dogs, motion-tripped perimeter lights, Closed-Circuit Television (CCTV) cameras with Infrared lenses and time-and-date stamped, high-resolution digital recording, and alarm systems to supplement the handgun under the pillow. All electronic security devices should have their own rechargeable power and be capable of operating all night independent from the power grid. A generic sign warning of the alarm system without specifying the brand name of the alarm system can be a big deterrant to burglars and home invaders.

    If these security technologies are not available, a Survivalist group should have members take turns on night watch, so that no one has the whole burden of insomnia. Sealing food tight and hanging food from a high tree branch will keep bears from getting to your biscuits and strawberry preserves while you sleep as well.

    Oh, by the way: "'Night, All!"

    :)
    Last edited by TheUnboundOne; 01-03-2009, 05:47 PM. Reason: Added ideas and Evening Salutations

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  • Big_Saw
    replied
    I'm tired right now, and thanking God I'm not BBC....;)

    But, seriously...really good post. No matter what shape you're in, or how much rest you're missing in life, your training - or lack of it - will have an effect on your survival....and instincts don't just graft themselves into your subconscious....you need to train in every skillset you possess!

    Leave a comment:


  • Zombie Axe
    replied
    Good posts :)

    Sometimes one must continue on with the mission even for lack of sleep. Stimulants such as caffiene do allow you to continue functioning but are not substitute for sleep!

    I carry 5 hour energy in my bob/ghb as well as coffee to help get me through the times when sleep is not an option...

    On the other hand sleep aids such as the ingredients in Benedyrl and Melatonin will help you get to sleep and both have a place in your bob/ghb as well.

    Lack of sleep can allow you to do stupid things :(

    Leave a comment:


  • beebopcop
    replied
    Originally posted by Brosia View Post
    Thinking of this since I've had all of 2 hours sleep last night....

    In a SHTF situation, I think sleep deprivation could be a real problem as you'd probably have to stay awake long periods of time (hunting/defending/building shelter/etc)

    Came across this little tidbit:



    "Well learned automatic responses are not vulnerable" Sounds like it would be a good idea for all emergency preparedness skills to become second-nature.
    Brosia, interestingly enough I had this theory tested last night. Because of my schedule changing every two weeks I take a lot of over the counter sleep aids and occasionally a prescritpion one just to get to sleep. I had taken both last night and about 12:30 A.M. my pager went off because of a large crowd of people fighting in the town that I work in. I jumped up, got dressed and drove the 6 miles emergency traffic (80 and 90 miles an hour) to Badin to assist. I was in a daze the whole time. God and training is what saw me through. It's true, you react the way you train and according to the habits your body has learned.

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  • TheUnboundOne
    replied
    Brosia,

    Sleep deprivation is a common technique of mind control used by political and religious hucksters seeking a flock of sheep to sheer, as well as by captors of POWs.

    Hence, it is a must that a Survivalist never get caught by such mind manipulators and that any medical conditions that disturb sleep be treated ASAP before a SHTF scenario. That means treating sleep apnea and men-folk getting their prostates examined and treated after age 40.

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  • lazer128
    replied
    Good observation. Now...go to bed! :D

    Leave a comment:


  • Brosia
    started a topic Tiredness

    Tiredness

    Thinking of this since I've had all of 2 hours sleep last night....

    In a SHTF situation, I think sleep deprivation could be a real problem as you'd probably have to stay awake long periods of time (hunting/defending/building shelter/etc)

    Came across this little tidbit:

    Well learned automatic responses are not vulnerable, but the following are:

    Understanding a complex situation and ignoring irrelevant information

    Assessing risks and anticipating the range of consequences

    Dealing with surprise and the unexpected

    Keeping track of changing events

    Developing and updating strategies

    Effective communication

    Ability to think laterally and innovatively.
    "Well learned automatic responses are not vulnerable" Sounds like it would be a good idea for all emergency preparedness skills to become second-nature.
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