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What Are Some of Your Favorite Doomsday Novels?

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  • #16
    okay now I have a whole list to add to my kindle.....thanks guys........

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    • #17
      (bumping this thread)

      Speaking of things to add to your Kindle:

      Matthew Mather's 'CyberStorm' is interesting--it gave a new version of SHTF, focusing on the internet (as the name indicates) and with a different kind of main character: not a prepper. There's a prepper neighbor who's a key figure, but not the main character. I don't want to do spoilers, but both because the writing is good and there are various non-standard SHTF aspects, I'd recommend this one pretty highly.
      ALSO: very interesting bit about setting up a wireless mesh network. I've been interested in the idea of such ever since the 'One Laptop Per Child' campaign from way back. Every once in a while it comes up again, for a post-disaster scenario. Kinda of neat to see it incorporated in the story.

      I also liked Sean Platt and Johnny B. Truant's 'Invasion' (book 1 of their 'Alien Invasion' series). It was also on Kindle.
      I've only read this first book in that series, so can't say how the rest of it plays out, but the first book is mostly about bugging out and had aspects about doing so that were interesting and fresh (for me).
      Last edited by Schneb; 01-05-2018, 02:43 PM. Reason: adding the bit about a mesh network
      Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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      • #18
        tough read but worth it >>>>>> Malevil .....

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        • #19
          John Ringo in 2003 started a few series of books one called BLACK TIDE RISING A SHTF story of the rebuilding of the USA after Zombie pandemic hit the world and killed 7 billion people.

          It had good facts about big business, the government, and a families reaction to the pandemic. Great read.

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          • #20
            if you want some halfway realistic PAW lit concerning pandemic - Steven Konkoly starting with Jakarta Pandemic - the first in his book series ....

            brings up a few topics concerning SHTF survival - pandemics in particular - provides all the reasons why OPSEC is #1 ....

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            • #21
              Malevil looks interesting. How did you come across it?

              It would be interesting to put all of these dooms day books on a timeline of when they were written and see how books like that changed over time.

              Alas Babylon and Malevil seem sort of similar in terms of how their S hits TF: both are post nukes.

              EMPs seem like the hot idea, currently.

              But there are apocalypses by disease, too. When were they popular? What was the first one?

              I was guessing H.G. Wells' 'War of the Worlds' sort of led the way, but reading the Wikipedia page on it, there are other novels mentioned that dealt with a German (Prussian) invasion of Great Britain. It seems like 'invasion' literature was very popular after the Franco-Prussian War.

              Seems like these sorts of things point towards whatever people feared at the time. No big surprise there, but interesting to see how events like the Franco-Prussian War can, through a series of steps, connect with the (kinds of) books listed here.
              Last edited by Schneb; 01-05-2018, 05:30 PM.
              Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by Schneb View Post
                Malevil looks interesting. How did you come across it?

                It would be interesting to put all of these dooms day books on a timeline of when they were written and see how books like that changed over time.

                Alas Babylon and Malevil seem sort of similar in terms of how their S hits TF: both are post nukes.

                EMPs seem like the hot idea, currently.

                But there are apocalypses by disease, too. When were they popular? What was the first one?

                I was guessing H.G. Wells' 'War of the Worlds' sort of led the way, but reading the Wikipedia page on it, there are other novels mentioned that dealt with a German (Prussian) invasion of Great Britain. It seems like 'invasion' literature was very popular after the Franco-Prussian War.

                Seems like these sorts of things point towards whatever people feared at the time. No big surprise there, but interesting to see how events like the Franco-Prussian War can, through a series of steps, connect with the (kinds of) books listed here.


                read Malevil first time about 30-35 years ago when it first translated from French - not eazy finding the hard copies these days - brought home a original copy from Europe ... too bad the guy started writing so late in life ....
                Last edited by Illini Warrior; 01-05-2018, 07:51 PM.

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                • #23
                  another obscure novel that's a good nuke PAW novel is Long Voyage Home by Luke Rhinehart - published back in the nuke threat hay days of the early 80s (Day After/Threads/Testament movies) .... group escapes the US east coast on a catamaran - Alas Babylon on the high seas ....
                  Last edited by Illini Warrior; 01-05-2018, 08:10 PM.

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                  • #24
                    Thanks for the bump on this Schneb. I need to go back thru this list. I read a lot of different PAW/ SHTF stories. My issue is that I often just do the ones I can get for free on Kindle. If I really like a series I'll buy the other books but sometimes it seems like the books start to get shorter and shorter and the cost increase. So u might get the first book for free and say it's a 350+ page book. then by book 3 they're only 130 page and they want 3.99 for them.

                    I don't get into the zombie books, a bit to far off for me. though now and then I'll stumble across one with mutants or something I can deal with. James Wesley Rawles has quite a few good ones. Collision course by David Crawford.

                    I just finished up a pretty decent read called Apocalypsis by Elle Casey. Plan to read the next 2 books in the series but gonna wait in hopes price comes down some...

                    I have hundreds downloaded on my Kindle from free sites I check out about every day. I think the thing that aggravates me the most about my Kindle is the fact that it won't (or if it does I haven't figured out how to) allow you to set up your own folders and organize. Wish I could have say a SHTF book folder, Homestead tip books, self protection, cooking, etc...

                    If anyone knows of a way or an ap that will let you organize your Kindle Library I'd love to hear about it.
                    I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                    • #25
                      I'm looking at my Kindle 'library' and also feeling frustrated. It doesn't show some free samples that I downloaded, and if there's a way to get rid of things in it that I've read and am done with, I can't tell what that way is. I think I figured it out once and DID get rid of a title or two, but it shouldn't be so hard to figure out that I have to struggle with doing so.

                      I don't think customer satisfaction is a key part of how Kindle is being designed/operated. Seems like they've got a way that works well enough to allow folks to get books and such, so--as far as they're concerned--it aint broke. And with the backing of Amazon to drive people to keep using it, maybe they're just being smart business folks.

                      But I can think of a bunch of things with it that are pretty cruddy compared to how other apps and such work.
                      Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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                      • #26
                        Ive got the Kindle Fire. I think from the home screen if u long press a title it comes up and asks if u want to delete from the carousel or device.
                        I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                        • #27
                          One Second After by William Forstchen is excellent. I believe he has written sequels to it as well. There is an audio book series on You Tube that starts with Going Home by A. American. There are three or four books in the series, and they are all quite good. IMHO all of these capture the end of life as we know it.
                          The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

                          Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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                          • #28
                            Can't believe I overlooked One Second After - I have it here on my shelf in paperback. The Going Home series was great and there was another one I'm trying to remember, was at least 8 or 9 books in it. Took place in like SW, Arizona to Texas... I'll need to scroll thru my Kindle collection and see if I can find it. Story kept going but I noticed the books got shorter and the price went higher. Sorry I'm not paying 5-8 bucks for a 110-150 pg installment. I'm sure some of these authors are under the gun to shove out the next installment and to get the next pay check but they have to maintain some sort of integrity. make it a 300+ page sequel and I'll pay that money for it if the book and storyline are quality and hold my interest.

                            The ones that drive me crazy, and luckily it's usually free ones, are those authors with horrible spelling, grammar, typos and errors. Like those that don't seem to know the difference between to, too and two or here and hear though that isn't as big a bother as a sentence or paragraph that is totally chopped and makes zero sense but they didn't notice it or if they did they didn't bother to read what they actually wrote, vs what they had intended to write. i honestly think they get done, push back and go "yep, done". If they would sit down and read it from start to finish with a highligther and pencil in hand, and actually read the words and not skim it as they think they wrote it they could catch a lot of their own errors before they publish.

                            OK off my soapbox
                            Last edited by CountryGuy; 01-10-2018, 12:17 AM.
                            I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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                            • #29
                              [...]
                              Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
                              The ones that drive me crazy, [...] are those authors with horrible spelling, grammar, typos and errors.
                              [...]

                              About that--yes! Except then I'll catch myself in that same sort of error. Different though, if it's a book that's commercially published vs. a comment or email.

                              A glaring example: as far as I can tell, anything by Jacqueline Druga. She is great at dialogue and her characters seem true to life, and she doesn't junk things up with romantic story lines (I'd be okay with that but it seems like that's a weak point in a lot of PA story lines), but MAN, does she need an editor...which is a kind of regular drum-beat of commentary in her Amazon reviews.

                              That said, I bought the second in her 'Three Miles Out' set of books because the first was good enough that I was hooked.

                              I liked that she didn't try to spin it out endlessly, too, with a 3rd, 4th and so on, in the series.

                              And there's something about her style and website and such that sort of makes a statement (as far as I saw it, at least) to the effect of her just telling stories and putting them out there and not getting caught up in a professional level of publishing. She's a single mom/grandma according to her website and seems to be just a natural story teller who's found a way to put her ideas down in writing and share them out to the world via Amazon.

                              The teacher in me wants her to go back and fix the glitches in her writing, but I sort of like the idea of someone breaking through the usual layers/barriers of publishing and getting to share their talent and earn an income from doing so. I've only read 2 of her books (from one series) but looking at descriptions of the others, seems like she's kind of focused on the idea of a plague/etc. that basically culls the world's population. Maybe she branches out into other ideas in books I haven't looked at.

                              I'd add her to the list but with a big warning about the typos and such.
                              Been there, done that. Then been there again several times, because apparently I never learn.

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                              • #30
                                I'll have to check her out. I can deal with typos but it's the paragraph or sentence chopped off mid thought, or you can tell from one paragraph to the next at least one or more paragraphs are missing and you have to jump in your mind and assume what they may have been trying to tell you. or maybe a few pages will get so choppy and jumping back and forth or ideas totally missing to the point you have to reread it 2 or 3 times trying to guess at what they were trying to convey. That is sloppy and doesn't require professional edit. I'm not an edit snob but for the love of all that is Holy can they give it to some family and friends to read and suggest edit corrections. As for typos, what can you write in today that doesn't have spell check of some sort, heck this little comment window does, thankfully. I'll bet those things together would catch 95% of the issues.
                                I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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