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testing myself.. didnt do that great.

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  • maric
    replied
    Originally posted by Oscar Wilde View Post
    You one tough cookie ....

    O.W.
    lol.. nah, just couldnt wait to pop that baby out!!! I walked non-stop just trying to induce.. I did ALL the things they tell you... didnt work... SHE was the tough cookie.. I just like hiking, thats all! Ill go thru some old pics, didnt take too many cause I was orka big, and all, but I know I have one some where of us hiking back then! :)

    ...found one... told ya I hiked when pregnant! Think it was about 7 and a half months here give or take a few weeks!
    Attached Files
    Last edited by maric; 05-07-2011, 04:48 PM. Reason: adding pics

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  • Oscar Wilde
    replied
    Originally posted by maric View Post
    .... We would hike an easy 6 or so miles when I was 9 months prego, with one on my hip..
    You one tough cookie ....

    O.W.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by maric View Post
    lol... Well thanks. It seems like after I had the kiddos, and hit my 30's, the metabolism all went down hill. That and having 2 little ones so young.. just always so tired. Energy has dropped.. gotta try to eat healthier. We cook tons, its me and the old mans way of bonding, seasoning, prepping, drinks and a good meal, BUT I have to work on the physical regiment. Hiking took a back seat for about a yearish.. but now were back on track.. just incorporating it with the 2 little ones!
    Yeah a lot of things take a backseat when you have kids. Its nice when they get to the age were they start enjoying the hikes.

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  • maric
    replied
    Originally posted by PT945 View Post
    6 mile hike at 9 months pregnant. You are in great shape I would say. That or my ex was way out of shape cause she couldn't walk to the mail box without having to take a nap afterwards.
    lol... Well thanks. It seems like after I had the kiddos, and hit my 30's, the metabolism all went down hill. That and having 2 little ones so young.. just always so tired. Energy has dropped.. gotta try to eat healthier. We cook tons, its me and the old mans way of bonding, seasoning, prepping, drinks and a good meal, BUT I have to work on the physical regiment. Hiking took a back seat for about a yearish.. but now were back on track.. just incorporating it with the 2 little ones!

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by maric View Post
    Ive never really had to ruck it much with a pack.. maybe a light backpack..(this is the Mrs- not Mr to distinguish, he'd have a WHOLE different answer being an infantryman and all) BUT, we would really hiked tons with all my pregnancies (4) We would hike an easy 6 or so miles when I was 9 months prego, with one on my hip.. Its only been recently that I am learning, and adjusting to hiking with weight on my back. Whole different ball game!!I hiked last wkend with the baby carrier, baby aboard, tough, but not as bad as I thought.. (pic FINALLY posted) lol.. and Ive learned how much I need to improve my shoulder and back strength! Ill wear my pack around the house too, just to break it in... adjustments take some time (as Im sure ya'll know) and I want it fitting right! Also, I can NOT hear enough from the MR.. pushups -pushups- pushups.. My upper body strength isnt where it should be... so, just a ladies perspective, I guess... :) Its good PT though, and it will come in handy!
    6 mile hike at 9 months pregnant. You are in great shape I would say. That or my ex was way out of shape cause she couldn't walk to the mail box without having to take a nap afterwards.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by CountryGuy View Post
    Wondering if you wore the typical clothes and shoes you wear to work or do you keep a change and spare shoes or boots in your truck?
    I was in my work boots, jeans and button down denim shirt, my usual work clothes.

    Leave a comment:


  • maric
    replied
    Ive never really had to ruck it much with a pack.. maybe a light backpack..(this is the Mrs- not Mr to distinguish, he'd have a WHOLE different answer being an infantryman and all) BUT, we would really hiked tons with all my pregnancies (4) We would hike an easy 6 or so miles when I was 9 months prego, with one on my hip.. Its only been recently that I am learning, and adjusting to hiking with weight on my back. Whole different ball game!!I hiked last wkend with the baby carrier, baby aboard, tough, but not as bad as I thought.. (pic FINALLY posted) lol.. and Ive learned how much I need to improve my shoulder and back strength! Ill wear my pack around the house too, just to break it in... adjustments take some time (as Im sure ya'll know) and I want it fitting right! Also, I can NOT hear enough from the MR.. pushups -pushups- pushups.. My upper body strength isnt where it should be... so, just a ladies perspective, I guess... :) Its good PT though, and it will come in handy!

    Leave a comment:


  • CountryGuy
    replied
    Wondering if you wore the typical clothes and shoes you wear to work or do you keep a change and spare shoes or boots in your truck?

    Originally posted by PT945 View Post
    . I decided on 5 miles for my walk, because that's about the average distance I am away from home give or take a mile. I also wanted to do this on less than normal sleep and not having eaten breakfast, I did this to give it a SHTF Type twist.
    I have never carried my bag on my shoulders its always in the truck .

    Leave a comment:


  • cbprice797
    replied
    I am doing about 4 miles every other night with 35 pounds. Even do it when raining, when it is warm that is, so I can use my Gore Tex pants and my old style poncho. Not losing much weigth but am noticing that I am getting my cardio in better shape,

    Leave a comment:


  • badkarma
    replied
    I plan on staying in place as well. With that being said....I have to GET in place first. I work about 18 miles from home, so it would be a full day's walk if I couldn't drive part of the way. I plan on 25 miles by foot, because I will recon 2 miles BEFORE driving. There's no point in moving your BOV a mile or less only to get quagmired in traffic and contributing to the problem.

    I currently have a Maxpedition Kodiak, which is an over built, excellent solution for a mile or two. After 10 miles it's a completely different ball game. I learned early that I need a framed pack with a support belt. However, the Kodiak is what I have.....so it's what I'll use the ONE TIME I'll need it. If you think using a gearslinger for 10 miles sucks.....try carrying your stuff in a trash bag for a mile.

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by Snow Walker View Post
    SO WHAT, your out of shape. I think alot of people are and I work on that myself. The important thing is you realize it and are doing something about it! Good for you for testing yourself.

    I will always carry more gear then needed for a few reasons...

    You have to know what your capable of and/or your limitations which you will only find out by putting youself to the test.

    I like the extra weight because it gives me a work out.

    The extra gear also gives me the opportunity to experiment with gear and see how it performs. I try all my gear out and if I don't like it it gets sold or given away. I have no use for faulty gear or something that doesn't perform to my expectations.

    "The more you sweat in peace the less you bleed in war" Not sure who said that other then my Drill Sergeant, but he was right!!!!!!

    Good thread topic!
    I've doubled the weight of my pack, still havent added any more distance to my walks, one step at a time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Snow Walker
    replied
    SO WHAT, your out of shape. I think alot of people are and I work on that myself. The important thing is you realize it and are doing something about it! Good for you for testing yourself.

    I will always carry more gear then needed for a few reasons...

    You have to know what your capable of and/or your limitations which you will only find out by putting youself to the test.

    I like the extra weight because it gives me a work out.

    The extra gear also gives me the opportunity to experiment with gear and see how it performs. I try all my gear out and if I don't like it it gets sold or given away. I have no use for faulty gear or something that doesn't perform to my expectations.

    "The more you sweat in peace the less you bleed in war" Not sure who said that other then my Drill Sergeant, but he was right!!!!!!

    Good thread topic!

    Leave a comment:


  • cj_002
    replied
    Better the ASP than trying to eat the dog for breakfast in front of the owners....even harder to explain that one to the authorities...

    Leave a comment:


  • PT945
    replied
    Originally posted by Oscar Wilde View Post
    Year an a half ago I realized I needed to get back in my groove .... took a framed ruck and packed just basic necessities and started walking the hood. I wore heavy logging boots, level II vest and hung a 3 liter camel back from my neck, my ruck weighed about 50lbs. .... 1.5 miles and I decided to call it a night.

    Did this every other night for a week .... added 5-10 lbs the next week and increased the distance a 1/4 mile. Eventually I was doing 4.5 with 90lbs .... I decided to step into the woods with this .... world of difference. If you take notice to your stride you'll see that when you walk on on a prepared surface your feet come up off the surface by about an inch .... off road you'll be doing some serious high steppin .... completely different dynamic, talk about gettin it handed to ya.

    Back on my normal routine I decided to wear my regular (comparably lighter) boots .... about 3/4 of a mile from the house my left heel began to burn as though I'd suddenly developed a blister .... turned about and within 50 yards, right heel began to burn .... I was walkin on my tip toes the last hundred yards to the house. Removed my boots .... no blisters. For the next week it was very uncomfortable to walk "normally" barefoot or otherwise. Although there was no visible sign of injury I had obviously done some sort of damage.

    About 12 months later I'm able to strap the ruck back on and push mow 2 acres of grass on mildly rolling terrain and back at 1.5 miles on pavement. Moral of the story .... get your gear out .... discover your weaknesses and make the necessary adjustments.

    O.W.
    Great input. Thanks. I definitely know my weakness and can guarantee ill be working on it.

    Leave a comment:


  • Oscar Wilde
    replied
    Year an a half ago I realized I needed to get back in my groove .... took a framed ruck and packed just basic necessities and started walking the hood. I wore heavy logging boots, level II vest and hung a 3 liter camel back from my neck, my ruck weighed about 50lbs. .... 1.5 miles and I decided to call it a night.

    Did this every other night for a week .... added 5-10 lbs the next week and increased the distance a 1/4 mile. Eventually I was doing 4.5 with 90lbs .... I decided to step into the woods with this .... world of difference. If you take notice to your stride you'll see that when you walk on on a prepared surface your feet come up off the surface by about an inch .... off road you'll be doing some serious high steppin .... completely different dynamic, talk about gettin it handed to ya.

    Back on my normal routine I decided to wear my regular (comparably lighter) boots .... about 3/4 of a mile from the house my left heel began to burn as though I'd suddenly developed a blister .... turned about and within 50 yards, right heel began to burn .... I was walkin on my tip toes the last hundred yards to the house. Removed my boots .... no blisters. For the next week it was very uncomfortable to walk "normally" barefoot or otherwise. Although there was no visible sign of injury I had obviously done some sort of damage.

    About 12 months later I'm able to strap the ruck back on and push mow 2 acres of grass on mildly rolling terrain and back at 1.5 miles on pavement. Moral of the story .... get your gear out .... discover your weaknesses and make the necessary adjustments.

    O.W.

    Leave a comment:

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