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what type of books are you reading?

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  • what type of books are you reading?

    Let's start a new topic on books. They can be on prepping or just general books like romance, thrillers, mysteries, whatever you like to read.
    Some that I have read are:
    The outline of history by H. G. Wells, The prepper's water survival guide by Daisy Luther, Complete wilderness training manual (be prepared) by Hugh McManners, Dare to prepare by Holly Drennan Deyo, The prepper's blueprint by Tess Penningtion.
    I am in process of reading The Encyclopedia of Country living by Carla Emery and a second one Illustrated Encyclopedia of country living by abigail R. Gehring. Also Homemade soapmaking: A beginner's guide by Lisa Daniels. Divided we fall: a post-apocalyptic novel of America's coming civil war by Mark Goodwin. Beyond the new horizon: living on the edge by Christine Conway. I have read all but one of her books as one just came out I don't have yet. Good books. Nuclear War survival skills lifesaving nuclear facts by Cresson H. Kearny. I have lots more but this is a start.
    What have you read or are reading now?

  • #2
    It is easier for me to list authors. I am a voracious reader both fiction and non-fiction. My non-fiction interest tends to lean toward the Civil War, and the old West. I had to buy a copy of Ron Chernow's, Grant, a biography of Ulysses Grant. I renewed it so many times from the Library I was embarrassed to go back. It is very good, but it is about a thousand pages, and you need a magnifying glass to see the type. I would get his books on Hamilton, and Washington, but I don't think I will live long enough to read them. I also own Shelby Foote's trilogy of the civil War.

    Fiction: Anything by John Grisham; David Baldacci; Nelson DeMille; Stuart Woods; Elmore Leonard; Robert B. Parker; probably others. I think I have read almost all of theirs.
    The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

    Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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    • #3
      September and October were all fiction.
      I finished up Arthur T. Bradley's "The Survivalist" series and a couple books from A.American (Going Home series)

      For November it was the following two:
      Merchants of Doubt - A documentary book about how a handful of corrupt scientists were paid to obscure the truth and cast doubt on well established scientific work. The book covers the tobacco industry and its fight, the fiasco with the ozone and CFC's (Chlorinated Fluorocarbons), and Global Warming. How the same corrupt individuals pulled the same tricks, how the industries cultivated these corrupt scientists, and what they did. (its mostly the same scientists employed by all three industries).

      The Unthinkable, Who Survives when Disaster Strikes - Another documentary, this one explores various disasters around the world and seeks to understand why some people survive and others don't. Why do some people die who should have survived and why do some people survive who should have died? The book dives into the psychology of crowds, the circuits within our brain that regulate fear, and the reasons some people handle danger and life threatening situations different than others. From the earliest disasters of the Mont Blanc ship, to the crash of Flight 90 into the Potomac, to 911 in the twin towers. The author interviews the survivors, enlists the help of scientific experts, and even has her own brain scanned my the US Army.

      For December, I'm just getting started:
      The Professional Soldier - Janowitz
      As I slowly make my way through the West Point required reading list, this one is next.

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      • #4
        Civil War buffs and survivalists will find this book enlightening: Ersatz in the Confederacy by Mary Elizabeth Massey. Published in 1952 by the University of South Carolina Press. The author was an Associate Professor of History, Winthrop College and was a stickler for minute details about how people dealt with the appalling hardships and tribulation of the Civil War days.

        Wow. In some places, even rats were becoming hard to come by for food. Common garden seeds were as rare as gold...there were serious salt shortages...

        Here is an eye-opening excerpt to chew on:


        "With meat practically nonexistent, fishing tackle scarce, and ammunition for hunting purposes hard to obtain, other substitutes had to be found. By the fall of 1864 things had come to such a pass that one (newspaper) editor suggested his readers resort to eating rats, frogs, fried snails, young crow, snakes, locusts, earthworms, cats and dogs... By this time many Confederates had already been eating these things. Rats had become an item in the diet of many. President Davis was quoted as saying that he saw no reason for not eating them, for he thought they would be "as good as squirrels." They were eaten in quantity by the besieged citizens of Vicksburg. On the eve of the capitulation of that city, a lady noted that rats were "hanging dressed in the market for sale...there is nothing else." They sometimes brought as much as $2.50 each. In Richmond, too, they found their way to the tables, while recipes for cooking them were circulated among the women."


        Imagine that! Even squirrels were in scarce supply, along with everything else that could be hunted...so much, that rats became an expensive market item. $2.50 was a LOT of money for that time period. ONE RAT = ALMOST $40 in today's dollars!!!!

        http://www.in2013dollars.com/1865-do...18?amount=2.50


        Aside from that bit of info, the entire book opened my eyes, and I learned a lot of new tricks about how to deal with potential future deprivations... Bought the book used on Amazon.

        ETA: I found tons of valuable and practical information packed in this 233-page book. The footnotes listed at the end of the book is so detailed that it even includes recipes and other rich notations.
        Last edited by GrizzlyetteAdams; 12-03-2018, 05:36 PM.
        Genius is making a way out of no way.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post

          Fiction: Anything by John Grisham; David Baldacci; Nelson DeMille; Stuart Woods; Elmore Leonard; Robert B. Parker; probably others. I think I have read almost all of theirs.
          You might enjoy Matt Bracken novels. Suggest start with the trilogy, and read in order. (NOTE: if you work for or have a deep love for the BATF&E, Read his other novels and not the trilogy).

          One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

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          • #6
            Thanks for the heads-up, Sourdough. I am always looking for a good new author with a large body of work.

            Grizz: that book sounds very interesting. If it is well foot noted it can at least be checked for accuracy, but it is probably quite accurate. There aren't many of us here who can truly appreciate the hardships and the horror of war. Many of the vets can, of course. I'm sure that book is quite an eye opener.
            The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

            Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Morgan101 View Post
              Thanks for the heads-up, Sourdough. I am always looking for a good new author with a large body of work.

              Grizz: that book sounds very interesting. If it is well foot noted it can at least be checked for accuracy, but it is probably quite accurate. There aren't many of us here who can truly appreciate the hardships and the horror of war. Many of the vets can, of course I'm sure that book is quite an eye opener.
              Oh it is! Historical accounts have a way of exposing--and exploding--many popular prepper beliefs and myths. This one, in particular, is impressive since it is relatively recent and on home soil.

              I ought to make a Cliff's Notes type summary of this book. It's that good.

              Genius is making a way out of no way.

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              • #8
                Morgan 101.......have you read everything by James Clavell....???

                I grieved when I realized I had nothing of his remaining to read..

                "WHIRLWIND" is a great tool for grasping the current happenings in Iran, and the whole Middle East.
                Last edited by Sourdough; 12-04-2018, 02:50 PM.
                One day you eat the chicken.....next day the left-over chicken.....next five days you eat chicken feathers, head and feet.

                Comment


                • #9
                  SD: I don't think I have read James Clavell since Shogun. Good call. I should catch up on his stuff.

                  Another author I like is Robert Knott. He has continued the Virgil Cole/Everett Hitch Western series that was started by Robert Parker. I think Robert Parker wrote the first four. Now there are ten in the series. They made the first one, Appaloosa, into a pretty good movie. Ed Harris, Vigo Mortensen, Jeremy Irons, Renee Zellwegger. It was pretty faithful to the book.
                  The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

                  Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

                  Comment

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