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  • Vehicle Kit

    I would think most, or all of us, keep a preparedness/survival kit in our cars. Question: Is your car kit stocked with items that only you will use, or do you include items for your family?

    When I first started prepping I started with a car kit. It was something that would get me through three days if I was stuck on the road. Operative word here is "ME". I was in the car by myself 90% of the time. I never thought about having supplies for anyone else. Now my thinking has changed. I have tried to include supplies for my family as well. I don't drive a tenth of what I used to. If a SHTF situation arose there is a good likelihood we would all be together.

    Do you keep enough items in your car, to include your family? What items do you keep?
    The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

    Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

  • #2
    I have 3 vehicles one which is our bug-out jeep. The other two are used for daily runs short range. They both have a bug-out bag for one. The jeep is fully packed except food and water.

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    • #3
      Morg,
      Like you I spent and still do spend a load of time in the car by myself. I used to travel a lot for my work with my region reaching N to S from VA to ME and as far west as OH; so I kept a more in-depth kit and GHB since I often was hundreds of miles from home. Now my daily commute is about 52 miles each way so I don't carry as large a kit as I could be home in a 2 or 3 day walk at the most. There are a few good size mountains but I only have to go up over a smaller one and it drops me down to an old rail bed that much of has been turned into part of the rails to trails system. I still carry more in winter and I do keep a small kit in my office that would be an add on.

      As to the family on the rare times we travel anymore a distance it's a full up van. with Mrs and kids we pack out the van with 7 so not much room again if we have any other items we're carrying. I do have a small van kit in addition to the vehicle emergency/ roadside kit and I will carry my one small bag that is a bit of a catch all. though more aimed at first-aid, water, munchies, and other things we might need should we break down or get stuck somewhere for a few hours.

      I keep trying to talk the Mrs into one of those Mercedes Benz Sprinter vans as we'd have a load of seats(like up to 12) and I could leave a footlocker size trunk in the back at all times with room for about 3 full size refrigerators to spare. But since she drives the kiddos around the most, she's not feeling the "mini-bus". I though think it makes a lot more sense than a Suburban.
      I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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      • #4
        CG: I remember the days of being a Road Warrior; logging what we used to call "windshield time". I enjoyed it, but wouldn't want to go back to it. Now my commute is only a couple of miles, so my needs have changed. What I have done is include a couple of extra blankets; Winter wear (coats, gloves, scarfs, hats), which are soon to be removed. Extra food. There would only be three of us, and my son and I are the same size, so that makes it easy. The rest of my gear will get us through. Just a minor adjustment in philosophy more than anything else.

        The other adjustment has been my thinking on a "72 Hour" kit. From what I have read every indication is that time period should be increased to at least 5-7 days; maybe even 10 days. I have not had personal experience with a SHTF scenario where emergency assistance was required. Maybe RICHFL could weigh in on how long it actually took for assistance to be provided. I have survived floods, tornados, power outages, blizzards, but nothing that caused us to evacuate or be stranded. Still, I am thinking a little farther out than 72 hours.
        The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

        Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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        • #5
          I agree on the needing more than 72 hrs but I also think many people don't realistically look at what they have and see how far it could be stretched. Many will pack a "72hr" bag and they have say 9 meals in there assuming 3 per day. Cut that to 2 meals a day and you're out to 4.5 days; one meal a day and we have 9 days. But do they have enough water to last 9 days or a means to get safe water to last them?

          Now it's most likely you'd have hunger pangs but you'd have some energy and not starve. if a person has some knowledge of wilds foraging, depending on your area and time of year, the gaps and shortage in calories can be filled in or additional days added. If you can fish, snare, etc... things could go indefinitely. A rat trap in your kit to get squirrel, chipmunks etc...wire to make a snare for rabbit, possum, coon, deer?
          I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you!

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          • #6
            All very true. Good points, CG.
            The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary.

            Everything happens for a reason. Sometimes the reason is you are stupid, and make bad decisions.

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            • #7
              I keep a GHB in the car, a lot of the time i'm on my own but this kit would be used by my wife also if she was in the car with me as I have multiples of stuff in the bag also gear that is used by more than one person like a fishing kit or an emergency shelter, several foil blankets etc.etc.

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